You are here

Diplomacy & Defense Think Tank News

Murky trade waters: regional tariff commitments and non-tariff measures in Africa

In several African regions, economic integration has successfully reduced tariff protection by freezing the opportunity to raise applied tariffs against fellow integration partners above those promised. In this paper, we examine whether the regional tariff commitments on the continent have come at the expense of adverse side-effects on the prevalence of other – non-tariff – trade barriers. More specifically, regional tariff commitments have not only amplified applied tariff overhangs – the difference between Most Favoured Nation (MFN) bound tariffs and effectively applied tariffs – for African members of the World Trade Organization (WTO), but have also sharply reduced their tariff policy space within Africa, thus leaving regulatory policies such as sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures and technical barriers to trade (TBT) as two of the few legitimate options to level the playing field with market competitors. Comparing the effects of applied tariff overhangs towards all vis-à-vis African trading partners on SPS and TBT notifications of 35 African WTO members between 2001 and 2017, we find no overall relationship between tariff overhangs and import regulation in our preferred model setting. By contrast, larger tariff overhangs specific to intra-African trade relations have a significant share in increasing the probability of SPS measures and TBT. Our findings have important implications for future Pan-African integration under the recently launched African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) in that success in fostering continental economic integration does not exclusively depend on the realisation of tariff liberalisation, but at the same time on a mindful coordination with non-tariff provisions.

Murky trade waters: regional tariff commitments and non-tariff measures in Africa

In several African regions, economic integration has successfully reduced tariff protection by freezing the opportunity to raise applied tariffs against fellow integration partners above those promised. In this paper, we examine whether the regional tariff commitments on the continent have come at the expense of adverse side-effects on the prevalence of other – non-tariff – trade barriers. More specifically, regional tariff commitments have not only amplified applied tariff overhangs – the difference between Most Favoured Nation (MFN) bound tariffs and effectively applied tariffs – for African members of the World Trade Organization (WTO), but have also sharply reduced their tariff policy space within Africa, thus leaving regulatory policies such as sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures and technical barriers to trade (TBT) as two of the few legitimate options to level the playing field with market competitors. Comparing the effects of applied tariff overhangs towards all vis-à-vis African trading partners on SPS and TBT notifications of 35 African WTO members between 2001 and 2017, we find no overall relationship between tariff overhangs and import regulation in our preferred model setting. By contrast, larger tariff overhangs specific to intra-African trade relations have a significant share in increasing the probability of SPS measures and TBT. Our findings have important implications for future Pan-African integration under the recently launched African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) in that success in fostering continental economic integration does not exclusively depend on the realisation of tariff liberalisation, but at the same time on a mindful coordination with non-tariff provisions.

Murky trade waters: regional tariff commitments and non-tariff measures in Africa

In several African regions, economic integration has successfully reduced tariff protection by freezing the opportunity to raise applied tariffs against fellow integration partners above those promised. In this paper, we examine whether the regional tariff commitments on the continent have come at the expense of adverse side-effects on the prevalence of other – non-tariff – trade barriers. More specifically, regional tariff commitments have not only amplified applied tariff overhangs – the difference between Most Favoured Nation (MFN) bound tariffs and effectively applied tariffs – for African members of the World Trade Organization (WTO), but have also sharply reduced their tariff policy space within Africa, thus leaving regulatory policies such as sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures and technical barriers to trade (TBT) as two of the few legitimate options to level the playing field with market competitors. Comparing the effects of applied tariff overhangs towards all vis-à-vis African trading partners on SPS and TBT notifications of 35 African WTO members between 2001 and 2017, we find no overall relationship between tariff overhangs and import regulation in our preferred model setting. By contrast, larger tariff overhangs specific to intra-African trade relations have a significant share in increasing the probability of SPS measures and TBT. Our findings have important implications for future Pan-African integration under the recently launched African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) in that success in fostering continental economic integration does not exclusively depend on the realisation of tariff liberalisation, but at the same time on a mindful coordination with non-tariff provisions.

How robust is the evidence on carbon pricing?

Carbon pricing is effective in reducing emissions while having limited negative economic effects. However, researchers and policymakers should be aware of several methodological issues that may reduce the reliability of the evidence on carbon pricing.

How robust is the evidence on carbon pricing?

Carbon pricing is effective in reducing emissions while having limited negative economic effects. However, researchers and policymakers should be aware of several methodological issues that may reduce the reliability of the evidence on carbon pricing.

How robust is the evidence on carbon pricing?

Carbon pricing is effective in reducing emissions while having limited negative economic effects. However, researchers and policymakers should be aware of several methodological issues that may reduce the reliability of the evidence on carbon pricing.

What can the Ethiopian manufacturing sector learn from the past?

According to the ten-year development plan of the Ethiopian government, the country will focus on the manufacturing sector using raw materials by 2017. In the second phase of the plan, from 2018 to 2022, it will turn its attention to "manufacturing sub-sectors that require high capital and skilled manpower". This article examines what the new policy can learn from previous policies adopted by the Ethiopian government.

What can the Ethiopian manufacturing sector learn from the past?

According to the ten-year development plan of the Ethiopian government, the country will focus on the manufacturing sector using raw materials by 2017. In the second phase of the plan, from 2018 to 2022, it will turn its attention to "manufacturing sub-sectors that require high capital and skilled manpower". This article examines what the new policy can learn from previous policies adopted by the Ethiopian government.

What can the Ethiopian manufacturing sector learn from the past?

According to the ten-year development plan of the Ethiopian government, the country will focus on the manufacturing sector using raw materials by 2017. In the second phase of the plan, from 2018 to 2022, it will turn its attention to "manufacturing sub-sectors that require high capital and skilled manpower". This article examines what the new policy can learn from previous policies adopted by the Ethiopian government.

Youth Participation in Global Governance for Sustaining Peace and Climate Action

European Peace Institute / News - Mon, 04/19/2021 - 18:15

Youth movements have played an increasingly prominent role in calling for action to address climate change. Many youth-led organizations are also engaged in initiatives to build peace in their communities. In global policymaking fora, however, youth remain sidelined.

This issue brief outlines the synergies between the youth, peace, and security (YPS) and youth climate action agendas. It also examines the factors that contribute to young people’s exclusion from global governance, including negative misperceptions of youth, outdated policy frameworks, lack of funding, and weak links between youth and global governance fora.

The paper concludes with recommendations for governments and multilateral institutions to better assess the links between youth, peace, and climate change and include young people in decision-making processes. Recommendations include:

  • Bridging the gap between national governments and youth organizations;
  • Bridging the gap between global governance institutions and youth organizations;
  • Systematically putting youth on the agenda of intergovernmental fora and conferences;
  • Prioritizing YPS and youth climate action within the UN Secretariat;
  • Making funding mechanisms more accessible to youth organizations; and
  • Expanding the evidence base on the intersections between youth, climate change, and peace.

Download

Investment facilitation for development: a toolkit for policymakers

Investment facilitation is key to a post-pandemic recovery and to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. This publication combines insight and analytical expertise relevant to negotiating and implementing investment facilitation for development. It is intended to support the WTO negotiation on this topic, as well as unilateral, bilateral and regional efforts to facilitate sustainable investment flows.
The publication includes lessons from negotiating and implementing relevant WTO agreements, an inventory of investment facilitation measures, as well as the proceedings of some 30 stakeholder consultations conducted under the ITC-DIE project on investment facilitation for development. Particular emphasis has been placed on the development dimension of investment facilitation.

Investment facilitation for development: a toolkit for policymakers

Investment facilitation is key to a post-pandemic recovery and to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. This publication combines insight and analytical expertise relevant to negotiating and implementing investment facilitation for development. It is intended to support the WTO negotiation on this topic, as well as unilateral, bilateral and regional efforts to facilitate sustainable investment flows.
The publication includes lessons from negotiating and implementing relevant WTO agreements, an inventory of investment facilitation measures, as well as the proceedings of some 30 stakeholder consultations conducted under the ITC-DIE project on investment facilitation for development. Particular emphasis has been placed on the development dimension of investment facilitation.

Investment facilitation for development: a toolkit for policymakers

Investment facilitation is key to a post-pandemic recovery and to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. This publication combines insight and analytical expertise relevant to negotiating and implementing investment facilitation for development. It is intended to support the WTO negotiation on this topic, as well as unilateral, bilateral and regional efforts to facilitate sustainable investment flows.
The publication includes lessons from negotiating and implementing relevant WTO agreements, an inventory of investment facilitation measures, as well as the proceedings of some 30 stakeholder consultations conducted under the ITC-DIE project on investment facilitation for development. Particular emphasis has been placed on the development dimension of investment facilitation.

Auf in die „grünen Zwanziger“!

Der Earth Day am 22. April steht in diesem Jahr unter dem Motto „Restore Our Earth!“, also der Aufforderung, unsere Erde wieder in Stand zu setzen. Dies kann nicht an einem einzelnen Aktionstag gelingen. Nach Einschätzung von UN-Generalsekretär António Guterres und den einschlägigen wissenschaftlichen Sachstandsberichten bleibt der Menschheit ein knappes Jahrzehnt, um die entsprechenden Maßnahmen zu ergreifen. Galten die 1920er Jahre des vergangenen Jahrhunderts aus einer westlich dominierten Weltsicht wahlweise als „années folles“, als „roaring twenties“ oder als „goldene Zwanziger“, könnte die nun vor uns liegende Dekade als „grüne Zwanziger“ in die Geschichte eingehen – und dies durchaus aus globaler Perspektive!

Die Chancen dafür stehen besser, als noch vor wenigen Jahren gedacht. Die Agenda 2030 für nachhaltige Entwicklung und das Pariser Klimaabkommen geben den Regierungen weltweit die normativen Grundlagen sowie explizite politische Mandate und Zielvorgaben, um die Zukunft entsprechend zu gestalten.

Der angestrebte Wandel ist nicht nur ethisch geboten. Strukturelle ökonomische Notwendigkeiten sprechen sowohl in wohlhabenden Industrienationen als auch in aufstrebenden Entwicklungs- und Schwellenländern noch stärker dafür als ein womöglich kurzlebiger Zeitgeist. Zudem gibt es einen beträchtlichen Vorlauf: Seit dem offiziell ersten Earth Day von 1990 wurden nachhaltige Entwicklung als Paradigma der internationalen Zusammenarbeit und die Bekämpfung des Klimawandels als zentrales Thema auf der internationalen politischen Agenda verankert. Es ist also kein historischer Zufall, dass Agenda 2030 und Pariser Abkommen gleichsam den internationalen Handlungsrahmen für die 2020er Jahre strukturieren.

Das Pariser Abkommen erfordert nicht nur, die globale Erwärmung zu bremsen, sondern auch den mit dem Klimawandel einhergehenden Risiken zu begegnen und die globalen Finanzflüsse dahingehend konsequent umzugestalten. Die Agenda 2030 bietet den Rahmen für 17 konkrete Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDGs), die universell gelten und dabei niemanden zurücklassen sollen – verbunden mit dem expliziten Anspruch, eben diese Ziele bis zum Jahr 2030 zu erreichen.

Die COVID-19-Pandemie hat diese Anstrengungen zurückgeworfen. Messbar untergräbt sie die sozioökonomischen Entwicklungserfolge der Vorjahre. Sie überfordert Gesundheitssysteme und verstärkt die Auswirkungen paralleler Krisen, deren vielfältige Ursachen Dürrekatastrophen, Heuschreckenplagen und Gewaltkonflikte einschließen.

Zugleich bietet die globale Reaktion auf „Corona“ große Chancen, strukturelle Maßnahmen für einen transformativen Wandel voranzutreiben und deren Schubkraft zu verstärken. Entscheidend für das Gelingen ist, dass die billionenschweren Konjunkturpakete als Hebel sozial-ökologischer Kurskorrekturen angesetzt werden und nicht – wie nach der globalen Finanz- und Wirtschaftskrise von 2008/2009 –primär auf die Wiederherstellung des Status quo ante zielen. An den nötigen Mitteln dürfte es dabei nicht fehlen: Schon im Oktober 2020 entsprachen die weltweit zugesagten Konjunkturhilfen bereits grob dem Dreifachen der Krisenreaktion von 2008/2009.

Dabei führt uns die Corona-Pandemie drastisch vor Augen, dass die integrierte Betrachtung komplexer Wirkungszusammenhänge nicht dem Wunsch nach wissenschaftlicher Selbstbeschäftigung entspringt, sondern materielle Realitäten abbildet. Konjunkturpakete mit sozial-ökologischen Zielen zu verknüpfen bedeutet auch, die nationalen Klimaziele mit den SDGs zu verzahnen und Handlungsfelder zu priorisieren, die eine hohe katalytische Wirkung erwarten lassen: Erneuerbare Energien, der Schutz von Biodiversität, Land- und Wasserressourcen und emissionsarme Infrastrukturen, speziell in der Stadtentwicklung. Auch die Notwendigkeit, die landwirtschaftliche Produktion derart zu steigern, dass die Ernährung einer wachsenden Weltbevölkerung gesichert und zugleich landwirtschaftliche Treibhausgasemissionen gemindert werden, um einen Klimawandel zu verhindern, der wiederum die landwirtschaftlichen Produktionsbedingungen untergräbt, ist exemplarisch für die Komplexität der Zusammenhänge. Hier zeigt sich eines der zentralen Spannungsfelder zwischen nachhaltiger Entwicklung und Klimapolitik, die ihrerseits auf funktionstüchtige Landressourcen und Kohlenstoffsenken angewiesen ist.

Die unlängst veröffentlichte und umfassend überarbeitete Deutsche Nachhaltigkeitsstrategie wie auch der europäische „Green Deal“ weisen genau in die Richtung eines solchen integrierten Politikverständnisses. Gelingt es, derartige Strategien unter dem Eindruck der Corona-Krise mit Leben zu füllen und die bislang vorherrschende Diskrepanz zwischen Einsicht und Handeln zu überwinden, spricht vieles dafür, dass wir zumindest am Beginn des „grünsten“ Jahrzehnts stehen, das die Welt seit Beginn der Industrialisierung gesehen hat. Das heißt nicht, dass der benötigte Wandel zum Selbstläufer wird. Um den Klimawandel zu bremsen und die SDGs zu erreichen, müssen Regierungen und Gesellschaften die verfügbaren Hebel konsequent nutzen. Dabei bleibt keine Zeit zu verlieren, denn auch das grünste Jahrzehnt wird immer nur ein Herzschlag der Zeitgeschichte sein.

Auf in die „grünen Zwanziger“!

Der Earth Day am 22. April steht in diesem Jahr unter dem Motto „Restore Our Earth!“, also der Aufforderung, unsere Erde wieder in Stand zu setzen. Dies kann nicht an einem einzelnen Aktionstag gelingen. Nach Einschätzung von UN-Generalsekretär António Guterres und den einschlägigen wissenschaftlichen Sachstandsberichten bleibt der Menschheit ein knappes Jahrzehnt, um die entsprechenden Maßnahmen zu ergreifen. Galten die 1920er Jahre des vergangenen Jahrhunderts aus einer westlich dominierten Weltsicht wahlweise als „années folles“, als „roaring twenties“ oder als „goldene Zwanziger“, könnte die nun vor uns liegende Dekade als „grüne Zwanziger“ in die Geschichte eingehen – und dies durchaus aus globaler Perspektive!

Die Chancen dafür stehen besser, als noch vor wenigen Jahren gedacht. Die Agenda 2030 für nachhaltige Entwicklung und das Pariser Klimaabkommen geben den Regierungen weltweit die normativen Grundlagen sowie explizite politische Mandate und Zielvorgaben, um die Zukunft entsprechend zu gestalten.

Der angestrebte Wandel ist nicht nur ethisch geboten. Strukturelle ökonomische Notwendigkeiten sprechen sowohl in wohlhabenden Industrienationen als auch in aufstrebenden Entwicklungs- und Schwellenländern noch stärker dafür als ein womöglich kurzlebiger Zeitgeist. Zudem gibt es einen beträchtlichen Vorlauf: Seit dem offiziell ersten Earth Day von 1990 wurden nachhaltige Entwicklung als Paradigma der internationalen Zusammenarbeit und die Bekämpfung des Klimawandels als zentrales Thema auf der internationalen politischen Agenda verankert. Es ist also kein historischer Zufall, dass Agenda 2030 und Pariser Abkommen gleichsam den internationalen Handlungsrahmen für die 2020er Jahre strukturieren.

Das Pariser Abkommen erfordert nicht nur, die globale Erwärmung zu bremsen, sondern auch den mit dem Klimawandel einhergehenden Risiken zu begegnen und die globalen Finanzflüsse dahingehend konsequent umzugestalten. Die Agenda 2030 bietet den Rahmen für 17 konkrete Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDGs), die universell gelten und dabei niemanden zurücklassen sollen – verbunden mit dem expliziten Anspruch, eben diese Ziele bis zum Jahr 2030 zu erreichen.

Die COVID-19-Pandemie hat diese Anstrengungen zurückgeworfen. Messbar untergräbt sie die sozioökonomischen Entwicklungserfolge der Vorjahre. Sie überfordert Gesundheitssysteme und verstärkt die Auswirkungen paralleler Krisen, deren vielfältige Ursachen Dürrekatastrophen, Heuschreckenplagen und Gewaltkonflikte einschließen.

Zugleich bietet die globale Reaktion auf „Corona“ große Chancen, strukturelle Maßnahmen für einen transformativen Wandel voranzutreiben und deren Schubkraft zu verstärken. Entscheidend für das Gelingen ist, dass die billionenschweren Konjunkturpakete als Hebel sozial-ökologischer Kurskorrekturen angesetzt werden und nicht – wie nach der globalen Finanz- und Wirtschaftskrise von 2008/2009 –primär auf die Wiederherstellung des Status quo ante zielen. An den nötigen Mitteln dürfte es dabei nicht fehlen: Schon im Oktober 2020 entsprachen die weltweit zugesagten Konjunkturhilfen bereits grob dem Dreifachen der Krisenreaktion von 2008/2009.

Dabei führt uns die Corona-Pandemie drastisch vor Augen, dass die integrierte Betrachtung komplexer Wirkungszusammenhänge nicht dem Wunsch nach wissenschaftlicher Selbstbeschäftigung entspringt, sondern materielle Realitäten abbildet. Konjunkturpakete mit sozial-ökologischen Zielen zu verknüpfen bedeutet auch, die nationalen Klimaziele mit den SDGs zu verzahnen und Handlungsfelder zu priorisieren, die eine hohe katalytische Wirkung erwarten lassen: Erneuerbare Energien, der Schutz von Biodiversität, Land- und Wasserressourcen und emissionsarme Infrastrukturen, speziell in der Stadtentwicklung. Auch die Notwendigkeit, die landwirtschaftliche Produktion derart zu steigern, dass die Ernährung einer wachsenden Weltbevölkerung gesichert und zugleich landwirtschaftliche Treibhausgasemissionen gemindert werden, um einen Klimawandel zu verhindern, der wiederum die landwirtschaftlichen Produktionsbedingungen untergräbt, ist exemplarisch für die Komplexität der Zusammenhänge. Hier zeigt sich eines der zentralen Spannungsfelder zwischen nachhaltiger Entwicklung und Klimapolitik, die ihrerseits auf funktionstüchtige Landressourcen und Kohlenstoffsenken angewiesen ist.

Die unlängst veröffentlichte und umfassend überarbeitete Deutsche Nachhaltigkeitsstrategie wie auch der europäische „Green Deal“ weisen genau in die Richtung eines solchen integrierten Politikverständnisses. Gelingt es, derartige Strategien unter dem Eindruck der Corona-Krise mit Leben zu füllen und die bislang vorherrschende Diskrepanz zwischen Einsicht und Handeln zu überwinden, spricht vieles dafür, dass wir zumindest am Beginn des „grünsten“ Jahrzehnts stehen, das die Welt seit Beginn der Industrialisierung gesehen hat. Das heißt nicht, dass der benötigte Wandel zum Selbstläufer wird. Um den Klimawandel zu bremsen und die SDGs zu erreichen, müssen Regierungen und Gesellschaften die verfügbaren Hebel konsequent nutzen. Dabei bleibt keine Zeit zu verlieren, denn auch das grünste Jahrzehnt wird immer nur ein Herzschlag der Zeitgeschichte sein.

Auf in die „grünen Zwanziger“!

Der Earth Day am 22. April steht in diesem Jahr unter dem Motto „Restore Our Earth!“, also der Aufforderung, unsere Erde wieder in Stand zu setzen. Dies kann nicht an einem einzelnen Aktionstag gelingen. Nach Einschätzung von UN-Generalsekretär António Guterres und den einschlägigen wissenschaftlichen Sachstandsberichten bleibt der Menschheit ein knappes Jahrzehnt, um die entsprechenden Maßnahmen zu ergreifen. Galten die 1920er Jahre des vergangenen Jahrhunderts aus einer westlich dominierten Weltsicht wahlweise als „années folles“, als „roaring twenties“ oder als „goldene Zwanziger“, könnte die nun vor uns liegende Dekade als „grüne Zwanziger“ in die Geschichte eingehen – und dies durchaus aus globaler Perspektive!

Die Chancen dafür stehen besser, als noch vor wenigen Jahren gedacht. Die Agenda 2030 für nachhaltige Entwicklung und das Pariser Klimaabkommen geben den Regierungen weltweit die normativen Grundlagen sowie explizite politische Mandate und Zielvorgaben, um die Zukunft entsprechend zu gestalten.

Der angestrebte Wandel ist nicht nur ethisch geboten. Strukturelle ökonomische Notwendigkeiten sprechen sowohl in wohlhabenden Industrienationen als auch in aufstrebenden Entwicklungs- und Schwellenländern noch stärker dafür als ein womöglich kurzlebiger Zeitgeist. Zudem gibt es einen beträchtlichen Vorlauf: Seit dem offiziell ersten Earth Day von 1990 wurden nachhaltige Entwicklung als Paradigma der internationalen Zusammenarbeit und die Bekämpfung des Klimawandels als zentrales Thema auf der internationalen politischen Agenda verankert. Es ist also kein historischer Zufall, dass Agenda 2030 und Pariser Abkommen gleichsam den internationalen Handlungsrahmen für die 2020er Jahre strukturieren.

Das Pariser Abkommen erfordert nicht nur, die globale Erwärmung zu bremsen, sondern auch den mit dem Klimawandel einhergehenden Risiken zu begegnen und die globalen Finanzflüsse dahingehend konsequent umzugestalten. Die Agenda 2030 bietet den Rahmen für 17 konkrete Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDGs), die universell gelten und dabei niemanden zurücklassen sollen – verbunden mit dem expliziten Anspruch, eben diese Ziele bis zum Jahr 2030 zu erreichen.

Die COVID-19-Pandemie hat diese Anstrengungen zurückgeworfen. Messbar untergräbt sie die sozioökonomischen Entwicklungserfolge der Vorjahre. Sie überfordert Gesundheitssysteme und verstärkt die Auswirkungen paralleler Krisen, deren vielfältige Ursachen Dürrekatastrophen, Heuschreckenplagen und Gewaltkonflikte einschließen.

Zugleich bietet die globale Reaktion auf „Corona“ große Chancen, strukturelle Maßnahmen für einen transformativen Wandel voranzutreiben und deren Schubkraft zu verstärken. Entscheidend für das Gelingen ist, dass die billionenschweren Konjunkturpakete als Hebel sozial-ökologischer Kurskorrekturen angesetzt werden und nicht – wie nach der globalen Finanz- und Wirtschaftskrise von 2008/2009 –primär auf die Wiederherstellung des Status quo ante zielen. An den nötigen Mitteln dürfte es dabei nicht fehlen: Schon im Oktober 2020 entsprachen die weltweit zugesagten Konjunkturhilfen bereits grob dem Dreifachen der Krisenreaktion von 2008/2009.

Dabei führt uns die Corona-Pandemie drastisch vor Augen, dass die integrierte Betrachtung komplexer Wirkungszusammenhänge nicht dem Wunsch nach wissenschaftlicher Selbstbeschäftigung entspringt, sondern materielle Realitäten abbildet. Konjunkturpakete mit sozial-ökologischen Zielen zu verknüpfen bedeutet auch, die nationalen Klimaziele mit den SDGs zu verzahnen und Handlungsfelder zu priorisieren, die eine hohe katalytische Wirkung erwarten lassen: Erneuerbare Energien, der Schutz von Biodiversität, Land- und Wasserressourcen und emissionsarme Infrastrukturen, speziell in der Stadtentwicklung. Auch die Notwendigkeit, die landwirtschaftliche Produktion derart zu steigern, dass die Ernährung einer wachsenden Weltbevölkerung gesichert und zugleich landwirtschaftliche Treibhausgasemissionen gemindert werden, um einen Klimawandel zu verhindern, der wiederum die landwirtschaftlichen Produktionsbedingungen untergräbt, ist exemplarisch für die Komplexität der Zusammenhänge. Hier zeigt sich eines der zentralen Spannungsfelder zwischen nachhaltiger Entwicklung und Klimapolitik, die ihrerseits auf funktionstüchtige Landressourcen und Kohlenstoffsenken angewiesen ist.

Die unlängst veröffentlichte und umfassend überarbeitete Deutsche Nachhaltigkeitsstrategie wie auch der europäische „Green Deal“ weisen genau in die Richtung eines solchen integrierten Politikverständnisses. Gelingt es, derartige Strategien unter dem Eindruck der Corona-Krise mit Leben zu füllen und die bislang vorherrschende Diskrepanz zwischen Einsicht und Handeln zu überwinden, spricht vieles dafür, dass wir zumindest am Beginn des „grünsten“ Jahrzehnts stehen, das die Welt seit Beginn der Industrialisierung gesehen hat. Das heißt nicht, dass der benötigte Wandel zum Selbstläufer wird. Um den Klimawandel zu bremsen und die SDGs zu erreichen, müssen Regierungen und Gesellschaften die verfügbaren Hebel konsequent nutzen. Dabei bleibt keine Zeit zu verlieren, denn auch das grünste Jahrzehnt wird immer nur ein Herzschlag der Zeitgeschichte sein.

When industrial policy fails to produce structural transformation: the case of Ethiopia

Despite the increasing foreign investment in many African economies, their participation in trade, and the economic growth that follows from it, structural transformation has remained limited. This blog takes a look at Ethiopia’s industrial policy and argues that the government has failed to sufficiently emphasize innovation in—and technology transfer to—domestic firms, leading to minimal “upgrading” of low to high value-added activities.

When industrial policy fails to produce structural transformation: the case of Ethiopia

Despite the increasing foreign investment in many African economies, their participation in trade, and the economic growth that follows from it, structural transformation has remained limited. This blog takes a look at Ethiopia’s industrial policy and argues that the government has failed to sufficiently emphasize innovation in—and technology transfer to—domestic firms, leading to minimal “upgrading” of low to high value-added activities.

Pages

THIS IS THE NEW BETA VERSION OF EUROPA VARIETAS NEWS CENTER - under construction
the old site is here

Copy & Drop - Can`t find your favourite site? Send us the RSS or URL to the following address: info(@)europavarietas(dot)org.