You are here

Diplomacy & Defense Think Tank News

Dissecting aid fragmentation: development goals and levels of analysis

Aid fragmentation is widely denounced, though recent studies suggest potential benefits. To reconcile these mixed findings, we make a case for studying differences across aid sectors and levels of analysis. Our cross-national time-series analysis of data from 141 countries suggests aid fragmentation promotes child survival and improves governance. However, just looking across countries has the potential to blur important within-country differences. We analyse subnational variation in Sierra Leone and Nigeria and find that the presence of more donors is associated with worse health outcomes, but better governance outcomes. This suggests that having more donors within a locality can be beneficial when they are working to improve the systems through which policies are implemented, but harmful when they target policy outcomes directly. A survey of Nigerian civil servants highlights potential mechanisms. Fragmentation in health aid may undermine civil servants’ morale, whereas diversity in governance aid can promote meritocratic behaviour.

Dissecting aid fragmentation: development goals and levels of analysis

Aid fragmentation is widely denounced, though recent studies suggest potential benefits. To reconcile these mixed findings, we make a case for studying differences across aid sectors and levels of analysis. Our cross-national time-series analysis of data from 141 countries suggests aid fragmentation promotes child survival and improves governance. However, just looking across countries has the potential to blur important within-country differences. We analyse subnational variation in Sierra Leone and Nigeria and find that the presence of more donors is associated with worse health outcomes, but better governance outcomes. This suggests that having more donors within a locality can be beneficial when they are working to improve the systems through which policies are implemented, but harmful when they target policy outcomes directly. A survey of Nigerian civil servants highlights potential mechanisms. Fragmentation in health aid may undermine civil servants’ morale, whereas diversity in governance aid can promote meritocratic behaviour.

Dissecting aid fragmentation: development goals and levels of analysis

Aid fragmentation is widely denounced, though recent studies suggest potential benefits. To reconcile these mixed findings, we make a case for studying differences across aid sectors and levels of analysis. Our cross-national time-series analysis of data from 141 countries suggests aid fragmentation promotes child survival and improves governance. However, just looking across countries has the potential to blur important within-country differences. We analyse subnational variation in Sierra Leone and Nigeria and find that the presence of more donors is associated with worse health outcomes, but better governance outcomes. This suggests that having more donors within a locality can be beneficial when they are working to improve the systems through which policies are implemented, but harmful when they target policy outcomes directly. A survey of Nigerian civil servants highlights potential mechanisms. Fragmentation in health aid may undermine civil servants’ morale, whereas diversity in governance aid can promote meritocratic behaviour.

Karsten Neuhoff: „Strategie der Bundesregierung kann Sustainable Finance endlich voran bringen“

Die Bundesregierung hat heute eine Sustainable-Finance-Strategie vorgelegt. Dazu ein Statement von Karsten Neuhoff, Leiter der Abteilung Klimapolitik am DIW Berlin und Mitglied im Sustainable-Finance-Beirat der Bundesregierung sowie der Wissenschaftsplattform Sustainable Finance:

Sustainable Finance ist ein großes Zukunftsthema – nachhaltige Investments, grüne Anleihen und anderes mehr werden immer wichtiger. Dass hier riesige Nachhaltigkeitschancen, aber auch Risiken für die Finanz- und Realwirtschaft schlummern, wird auch in der Sustainable-Finance-Strategie der Bundesregierung deutlich. Diese Chancen und Risiken sollen durch vorausschauende Berichterstattung quantifiziert werden, damit sie von AnlegerInnen und im Risikomanagement effektiv berücksichtigt werden können. Die Strategie führt dazu 26 Maßnahmen auf, die in Deutschland, in europäischen Prozessen und in internationaler Zusammenarbeit umgesetzt werden sollten. Die gemeinsam von Wirtschafts-, Finanz- und Umweltministerium entwickelte Strategie zeigt, dass so wirtschaftliche Entwicklung, Nachhaltigkeit und Finanzmarktstabilität in Einklang gebracht werden können.

E-government and democracy in Botswana: observational and experimental evidence on the effect of e-government usage on political attitudes

This study assesses whether the use of electronic government (e-government) services affects political attitudes. The results, based on evidence generated in Botswana, indicate that e-government services can, in fact, have an impact on political attitudes. E-government services are rapidly being rolled out around the globe. Governments primarily expect efficiency gains from these reforms. Whether e-government in particular, and information and communication technology (ICT) in general, affect societies is hotly debated. There are fears that democracy may be compromised by surveillance, censorship, fake news, interference in elections and other strategies facilitated by digital tools. This discussion paper adds to the nascent literature by investigating if the expanding e-government usage in Botswana affects individual support for democracy, regime satisfaction and interpersonal trust. Methodologically, the study relies on observational and experimental evidence. The observational approach assesses the impact of the usage of different e-services such as e-payments and electronic tax return filings on political attitudes. The experimental approach incentivises taxpayers to file their tax returns electronically. Both approaches build on an original in-person survey gauging the political attitudes of 2,109 citizens in Greater Gaborone. The survey was conducted in February and March 2020. In terms of results, we do not identify a general substantive effect for the impact of all e-services on political attitudes. For some of the e-services and attitudes tested, however, we find significant evidence. Furthermore, our study yields significant results for several of the linkages between the causal steps within our causal mechanisms. For instance, we find that e-government can empower citizens to engage in political activities and that, although e-government users on average report that the government is not addressing their needs, a simple incentivising message can significantly improve people’s feelings in this regard.

E-government and democracy in Botswana: observational and experimental evidence on the effect of e-government usage on political attitudes

This study assesses whether the use of electronic government (e-government) services affects political attitudes. The results, based on evidence generated in Botswana, indicate that e-government services can, in fact, have an impact on political attitudes. E-government services are rapidly being rolled out around the globe. Governments primarily expect efficiency gains from these reforms. Whether e-government in particular, and information and communication technology (ICT) in general, affect societies is hotly debated. There are fears that democracy may be compromised by surveillance, censorship, fake news, interference in elections and other strategies facilitated by digital tools. This discussion paper adds to the nascent literature by investigating if the expanding e-government usage in Botswana affects individual support for democracy, regime satisfaction and interpersonal trust. Methodologically, the study relies on observational and experimental evidence. The observational approach assesses the impact of the usage of different e-services such as e-payments and electronic tax return filings on political attitudes. The experimental approach incentivises taxpayers to file their tax returns electronically. Both approaches build on an original in-person survey gauging the political attitudes of 2,109 citizens in Greater Gaborone. The survey was conducted in February and March 2020. In terms of results, we do not identify a general substantive effect for the impact of all e-services on political attitudes. For some of the e-services and attitudes tested, however, we find significant evidence. Furthermore, our study yields significant results for several of the linkages between the causal steps within our causal mechanisms. For instance, we find that e-government can empower citizens to engage in political activities and that, although e-government users on average report that the government is not addressing their needs, a simple incentivising message can significantly improve people’s feelings in this regard.

E-government and democracy in Botswana: observational and experimental evidence on the effect of e-government usage on political attitudes

This study assesses whether the use of electronic government (e-government) services affects political attitudes. The results, based on evidence generated in Botswana, indicate that e-government services can, in fact, have an impact on political attitudes. E-government services are rapidly being rolled out around the globe. Governments primarily expect efficiency gains from these reforms. Whether e-government in particular, and information and communication technology (ICT) in general, affect societies is hotly debated. There are fears that democracy may be compromised by surveillance, censorship, fake news, interference in elections and other strategies facilitated by digital tools. This discussion paper adds to the nascent literature by investigating if the expanding e-government usage in Botswana affects individual support for democracy, regime satisfaction and interpersonal trust. Methodologically, the study relies on observational and experimental evidence. The observational approach assesses the impact of the usage of different e-services such as e-payments and electronic tax return filings on political attitudes. The experimental approach incentivises taxpayers to file their tax returns electronically. Both approaches build on an original in-person survey gauging the political attitudes of 2,109 citizens in Greater Gaborone. The survey was conducted in February and March 2020. In terms of results, we do not identify a general substantive effect for the impact of all e-services on political attitudes. For some of the e-services and attitudes tested, however, we find significant evidence. Furthermore, our study yields significant results for several of the linkages between the causal steps within our causal mechanisms. For instance, we find that e-government can empower citizens to engage in political activities and that, although e-government users on average report that the government is not addressing their needs, a simple incentivising message can significantly improve people’s feelings in this regard.

Protection, Justice, and Accountability: Cooperation between the International Criminal Court and UN Peacekeeping Operations

European Peace Institute / News - Mon, 05/03/2021 - 21:59

Most countries that host UN peacekeeping operations face an impunity gap. Their national courts often lack the capacity to prosecute international crimes such as genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and grave violations of human rights. As a result, special or hybrid courts and international courts, like the International Criminal Court (ICC), often have to step in. In such contexts, some UN peacekeeping operations have been mandated by the UN Security Council to support justice, fight impunity, and pursue accountability, mainly in support of national justice mechanisms.

This issue brief focuses on cooperation between UN peacekeeping missions and the ICC. After discussing the impunity gap when it comes to international criminal justice, it outlines frameworks that provide a foundation for cooperation between the ICC and the Security Council. It then explores the benefits of cooperation and the political barriers and conflict dynamics that have prevented UN peacekeeping operations from fully assisting the ICC.

The paper concludes by considering how the protection of civilians (POC)—particularly the establishment of a protective environment—could provide opportunities for cooperation between peacekeeping operations and the ICC in pursuit of a more coherent approach to international justice. Given that international justice reinforces protection mandates, POC could serve as a guiding principle for peace operations’ future support to international criminal justice. By reflecting and building on best practices and lessons learned from previous challenges, peacekeeping operations can more effectively pursue international justice and ensure the sustainability of their protection efforts.

Download

Wie COVID-19 die Vorteile einer Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit aufzeigt

Als Nebenprodukt der Pandemie ist in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit ein einmaliges globales Experiment in Gang gekommen. Aus vielen Länderbüros des globalen Südens wurden 2020 die internationalen Mitarbeiter*innen abgezogen und in ihre Heimatzentralen in Europa und Nordamerika zurückbeordert. Die betroffenen Entwicklungsprogramme kamen dadurch jedoch nicht unbedingt ins Stocken. In einigen Fällen ist sogar das Gegenteil zu beobachten. So zeigt eine gemeinsame Studie internationaler Nichtregierungsorganisationen und der australischen La Trobe University, dass der Rückzug internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Programmen in Ozeanien den Entscheidungsspielraum für lokale Akteure erheblich erweitert hat. Die Vorteile einer solchen Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit sollten in der Diskussion um zukünftige Ansätze der staatlichen und nichtstaatlichen Entwicklungszusammenarbeit berücksichtigt werden.

Der öffentliche Fokus liegt derzeit vor allem auf der Not und den wirtschaftlichen Schäden, die die COVID-19-Pandemie verursacht. So werden die Entwicklungserfolge vieler Länder des globalen Südens sowie der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten zunichte gemacht. Auch die global vereinbarten Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDGs) sind kaum noch im vorgesehenen Zeitplan zu erreichen. Trotz alledem kann die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit von den lokalen Reaktionen auf die Pandemie auch lernen. Die oben genannte Studie ist dafür ein gutes Beispiel. Sie zeigt, dass infolge des Rückzugs internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Entwicklungsprogrammen lokale Expertise und Netzwerke stärker genutzt wurden, die Zusammenarbeit zwischen lokalen Akteuren zunahm, Hierarchien abgebaut wurden und die Entscheidungsfindung insgesamt dezentralisiert wurde. Über die lokalen Mitarbeiter*innen der Entwicklungsorganisationen und ihre Partnerorganisationen hinaus konnten auch Akteur*innen auf nationaler Ebene die Prioritäten wieder stärker mitbestimmen, da sie die Agenda nicht wie zuvor von internationalen Expert*innen dominiert sahen. Gemäß dieser Bestandsaufnahme haben die veränderten Rahmenbedingungen in der Pandemie, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit oft schwer zu erreichende Ownership, also die nationale und lokale Verantwortung und das Engagement für Entwicklungsmaßnahmen, indirekt gestärkt.

Die Diskussion um die Vorteile dieser Lokalisierung, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit meist unter dem Stichwort „Partizipation“ geführt wird, wurde in den vergangenen Jahren vor allem in der Nothilfe geführt. „Lokalisierung“ meint die stärkere Übergabe von Entscheidungsgewalt und Ressourcen von internationalen Organisationen an lokale Akteure. Eine Untersuchung von Nothilfeprojekten über einen Zeitraum von drei Jahren bestätigt, dass diese durch stärkere Lokalisierung durchaus bessere Ergebnisse erzielten. So waren lokal angeleitete Maßnahmen zum Schutz von Flüchtlingen in Grenzregionen in Myanmar und Tunesien beispielsweise deutlich besser darin, informelle Ressourcen der Menschen wie Verwandtschafts- und Bekanntschaftsnetzwerke einzubeziehen als internationale Initiativen. Die Untersuchung zeigt darüber hinaus auf, dass viele mit einer stärkeren Lokalisierung verbundene Befürchtungen unbegründet waren und dass der wesentliche Hinderungsgrund für eine stärkere Lokalisierung die Weigerung internationaler Organisationen war, Macht abzugeben. Auch in der Entwicklungsforschung setzt sich zunehmend die Erkenntnis durch, dass eine zu starke Steuerung durch Entwicklungsorganisationen das Entstehen von Ownership verhindern und die Wirksamkeit von Projekten reduzieren kann. Daher sind neue Ansätze notwendig, die lokale Entscheidungen, das Einfließen lokaler Expertise sowie die Entwicklung lokal angepasster Lösungswege stärker ermöglichen und fördern.

Ein Ansatz, der sich in der Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit bereits bewährt hat, ist Problem Driven Iterative Adaptation (PDIA; problemgeleitete schrittweise Anpassung). Dieser Ansatz basiert auf der Analyse fehlgeschlagener Entwicklungsprojekte am Harvard Center for International Development. Lokale Partner wie Ministerien werden dabei nachfrageorientiert angeleitet, eigenständig Entwicklungsprobleme zu analysieren und auf Basis ihrer lokalen Expertise Lösungsstrategien zu entwickeln, die auf den jeweiligen Kontext zugeschnitten sind. Die lokalen Partner sind in diesem Prozess auch verantwortlich für die Umsetzung der vereinbarten Lösungsschritte. In wiederkehrenden Treffen tauschen sie sich über Fortschritte und Fehlschläge aus und passen die Vorgehensweise entsprechend an. Dabei lernen sie nicht nur mehr über konkrete Reformen, sondern entwickeln auch eine grundsätzliche Problemlösungskompetenz, die sie zukünftig eigenständig anwenden können. Somit ist PDIA ein möglicher Ansatz, um die Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, deren Vorteile durch die Pandemie deutlich geworden sind, stärker zu institutionalisieren. Dadurch könnte Entwicklungszusammenarbeit künftig nicht nur wirklich partizipativer, sondern möglicherweise auch wirksamer und nachhaltiger werden.

Michael Roll ist  Soziologe und Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter im Forschungsprogramm „Transformation politischer (Un-)Ordnung

Tim Kornprobst ist Teilnehmer des 56. Kurses des Postgraduierten-Programms am Deutschen Institut für Entwicklungspolitik. Er ist Koautor der Publikation Postkolonialismus & Post-Development: Praktische Perspektiven für die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit des Stipendiatischen Arbeitskreises Globale Entwicklung und postkoloniale Verhältnisse der Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES).

Wie COVID-19 die Vorteile einer Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit aufzeigt

Als Nebenprodukt der Pandemie ist in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit ein einmaliges globales Experiment in Gang gekommen. Aus vielen Länderbüros des globalen Südens wurden 2020 die internationalen Mitarbeiter*innen abgezogen und in ihre Heimatzentralen in Europa und Nordamerika zurückbeordert. Die betroffenen Entwicklungsprogramme kamen dadurch jedoch nicht unbedingt ins Stocken. In einigen Fällen ist sogar das Gegenteil zu beobachten. So zeigt eine gemeinsame Studie internationaler Nichtregierungsorganisationen und der australischen La Trobe University, dass der Rückzug internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Programmen in Ozeanien den Entscheidungsspielraum für lokale Akteure erheblich erweitert hat. Die Vorteile einer solchen Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit sollten in der Diskussion um zukünftige Ansätze der staatlichen und nichtstaatlichen Entwicklungszusammenarbeit berücksichtigt werden.

Der öffentliche Fokus liegt derzeit vor allem auf der Not und den wirtschaftlichen Schäden, die die COVID-19-Pandemie verursacht. So werden die Entwicklungserfolge vieler Länder des globalen Südens sowie der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten zunichte gemacht. Auch die global vereinbarten Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDGs) sind kaum noch im vorgesehenen Zeitplan zu erreichen. Trotz alledem kann die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit von den lokalen Reaktionen auf die Pandemie auch lernen. Die oben genannte Studie ist dafür ein gutes Beispiel. Sie zeigt, dass infolge des Rückzugs internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Entwicklungsprogrammen lokale Expertise und Netzwerke stärker genutzt wurden, die Zusammenarbeit zwischen lokalen Akteuren zunahm, Hierarchien abgebaut wurden und die Entscheidungsfindung insgesamt dezentralisiert wurde. Über die lokalen Mitarbeiter*innen der Entwicklungsorganisationen und ihre Partnerorganisationen hinaus konnten auch Akteur*innen auf nationaler Ebene die Prioritäten wieder stärker mitbestimmen, da sie die Agenda nicht wie zuvor von internationalen Expert*innen dominiert sahen. Gemäß dieser Bestandsaufnahme haben die veränderten Rahmenbedingungen in der Pandemie, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit oft schwer zu erreichende Ownership, also die nationale und lokale Verantwortung und das Engagement für Entwicklungsmaßnahmen, indirekt gestärkt.

Die Diskussion um die Vorteile dieser Lokalisierung, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit meist unter dem Stichwort „Partizipation“ geführt wird, wurde in den vergangenen Jahren vor allem in der Nothilfe geführt. „Lokalisierung“ meint die stärkere Übergabe von Entscheidungsgewalt und Ressourcen von internationalen Organisationen an lokale Akteure. Eine Untersuchung von Nothilfeprojekten über einen Zeitraum von drei Jahren bestätigt, dass diese durch stärkere Lokalisierung durchaus bessere Ergebnisse erzielten. So waren lokal angeleitete Maßnahmen zum Schutz von Flüchtlingen in Grenzregionen in Myanmar und Tunesien beispielsweise deutlich besser darin, informelle Ressourcen der Menschen wie Verwandtschafts- und Bekanntschaftsnetzwerke einzubeziehen als internationale Initiativen. Die Untersuchung zeigt darüber hinaus auf, dass viele mit einer stärkeren Lokalisierung verbundene Befürchtungen unbegründet waren und dass der wesentliche Hinderungsgrund für eine stärkere Lokalisierung die Weigerung internationaler Organisationen war, Macht abzugeben. Auch in der Entwicklungsforschung setzt sich zunehmend die Erkenntnis durch, dass eine zu starke Steuerung durch Entwicklungsorganisationen das Entstehen von Ownership verhindern und die Wirksamkeit von Projekten reduzieren kann. Daher sind neue Ansätze notwendig, die lokale Entscheidungen, das Einfließen lokaler Expertise sowie die Entwicklung lokal angepasster Lösungswege stärker ermöglichen und fördern.

Ein Ansatz, der sich in der Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit bereits bewährt hat, ist Problem Driven Iterative Adaptation (PDIA; problemgeleitete schrittweise Anpassung). Dieser Ansatz basiert auf der Analyse fehlgeschlagener Entwicklungsprojekte am Harvard Center for International Development. Lokale Partner wie Ministerien werden dabei nachfrageorientiert angeleitet, eigenständig Entwicklungsprobleme zu analysieren und auf Basis ihrer lokalen Expertise Lösungsstrategien zu entwickeln, die auf den jeweiligen Kontext zugeschnitten sind. Die lokalen Partner sind in diesem Prozess auch verantwortlich für die Umsetzung der vereinbarten Lösungsschritte. In wiederkehrenden Treffen tauschen sie sich über Fortschritte und Fehlschläge aus und passen die Vorgehensweise entsprechend an. Dabei lernen sie nicht nur mehr über konkrete Reformen, sondern entwickeln auch eine grundsätzliche Problemlösungskompetenz, die sie zukünftig eigenständig anwenden können. Somit ist PDIA ein möglicher Ansatz, um die Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, deren Vorteile durch die Pandemie deutlich geworden sind, stärker zu institutionalisieren. Dadurch könnte Entwicklungszusammenarbeit künftig nicht nur wirklich partizipativer, sondern möglicherweise auch wirksamer und nachhaltiger werden.

Michael Roll ist  Soziologe und Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter im Forschungsprogramm „Transformation politischer (Un-)Ordnung

Tim Kornprobst ist Teilnehmer des 56. Kurses des Postgraduierten-Programms am Deutschen Institut für Entwicklungspolitik. Er ist Koautor der Publikation Postkolonialismus & Post-Development: Praktische Perspektiven für die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit des Stipendiatischen Arbeitskreises Globale Entwicklung und postkoloniale Verhältnisse der Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES).

Wie COVID-19 die Vorteile einer Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit aufzeigt

Als Nebenprodukt der Pandemie ist in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit ein einmaliges globales Experiment in Gang gekommen. Aus vielen Länderbüros des globalen Südens wurden 2020 die internationalen Mitarbeiter*innen abgezogen und in ihre Heimatzentralen in Europa und Nordamerika zurückbeordert. Die betroffenen Entwicklungsprogramme kamen dadurch jedoch nicht unbedingt ins Stocken. In einigen Fällen ist sogar das Gegenteil zu beobachten. So zeigt eine gemeinsame Studie internationaler Nichtregierungsorganisationen und der australischen La Trobe University, dass der Rückzug internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Programmen in Ozeanien den Entscheidungsspielraum für lokale Akteure erheblich erweitert hat. Die Vorteile einer solchen Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit sollten in der Diskussion um zukünftige Ansätze der staatlichen und nichtstaatlichen Entwicklungszusammenarbeit berücksichtigt werden.

Der öffentliche Fokus liegt derzeit vor allem auf der Not und den wirtschaftlichen Schäden, die die COVID-19-Pandemie verursacht. So werden die Entwicklungserfolge vieler Länder des globalen Südens sowie der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten zunichte gemacht. Auch die global vereinbarten Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDGs) sind kaum noch im vorgesehenen Zeitplan zu erreichen. Trotz alledem kann die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit von den lokalen Reaktionen auf die Pandemie auch lernen. Die oben genannte Studie ist dafür ein gutes Beispiel. Sie zeigt, dass infolge des Rückzugs internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Entwicklungsprogrammen lokale Expertise und Netzwerke stärker genutzt wurden, die Zusammenarbeit zwischen lokalen Akteuren zunahm, Hierarchien abgebaut wurden und die Entscheidungsfindung insgesamt dezentralisiert wurde. Über die lokalen Mitarbeiter*innen der Entwicklungsorganisationen und ihre Partnerorganisationen hinaus konnten auch Akteur*innen auf nationaler Ebene die Prioritäten wieder stärker mitbestimmen, da sie die Agenda nicht wie zuvor von internationalen Expert*innen dominiert sahen. Gemäß dieser Bestandsaufnahme haben die veränderten Rahmenbedingungen in der Pandemie, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit oft schwer zu erreichende Ownership, also die nationale und lokale Verantwortung und das Engagement für Entwicklungsmaßnahmen, indirekt gestärkt.

Die Diskussion um die Vorteile dieser Lokalisierung, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit meist unter dem Stichwort „Partizipation“ geführt wird, wurde in den vergangenen Jahren vor allem in der Nothilfe geführt. „Lokalisierung“ meint die stärkere Übergabe von Entscheidungsgewalt und Ressourcen von internationalen Organisationen an lokale Akteure. Eine Untersuchung von Nothilfeprojekten über einen Zeitraum von drei Jahren bestätigt, dass diese durch stärkere Lokalisierung durchaus bessere Ergebnisse erzielten. So waren lokal angeleitete Maßnahmen zum Schutz von Flüchtlingen in Grenzregionen in Myanmar und Tunesien beispielsweise deutlich besser darin, informelle Ressourcen der Menschen wie Verwandtschafts- und Bekanntschaftsnetzwerke einzubeziehen als internationale Initiativen. Die Untersuchung zeigt darüber hinaus auf, dass viele mit einer stärkeren Lokalisierung verbundene Befürchtungen unbegründet waren und dass der wesentliche Hinderungsgrund für eine stärkere Lokalisierung die Weigerung internationaler Organisationen war, Macht abzugeben. Auch in der Entwicklungsforschung setzt sich zunehmend die Erkenntnis durch, dass eine zu starke Steuerung durch Entwicklungsorganisationen das Entstehen von Ownership verhindern und die Wirksamkeit von Projekten reduzieren kann. Daher sind neue Ansätze notwendig, die lokale Entscheidungen, das Einfließen lokaler Expertise sowie die Entwicklung lokal angepasster Lösungswege stärker ermöglichen und fördern.

Ein Ansatz, der sich in der Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit bereits bewährt hat, ist Problem Driven Iterative Adaptation (PDIA; problemgeleitete schrittweise Anpassung). Dieser Ansatz basiert auf der Analyse fehlgeschlagener Entwicklungsprojekte am Harvard Center for International Development. Lokale Partner wie Ministerien werden dabei nachfrageorientiert angeleitet, eigenständig Entwicklungsprobleme zu analysieren und auf Basis ihrer lokalen Expertise Lösungsstrategien zu entwickeln, die auf den jeweiligen Kontext zugeschnitten sind. Die lokalen Partner sind in diesem Prozess auch verantwortlich für die Umsetzung der vereinbarten Lösungsschritte. In wiederkehrenden Treffen tauschen sie sich über Fortschritte und Fehlschläge aus und passen die Vorgehensweise entsprechend an. Dabei lernen sie nicht nur mehr über konkrete Reformen, sondern entwickeln auch eine grundsätzliche Problemlösungskompetenz, die sie zukünftig eigenständig anwenden können. Somit ist PDIA ein möglicher Ansatz, um die Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, deren Vorteile durch die Pandemie deutlich geworden sind, stärker zu institutionalisieren. Dadurch könnte Entwicklungszusammenarbeit künftig nicht nur wirklich partizipativer, sondern möglicherweise auch wirksamer und nachhaltiger werden.

Michael Roll ist  Soziologe und Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter im Forschungsprogramm „Transformation politischer (Un-)Ordnung

Tim Kornprobst ist Teilnehmer des 56. Kurses des Postgraduierten-Programms am Deutschen Institut für Entwicklungspolitik. Er ist Koautor der Publikation Postkolonialismus & Post-Development: Praktische Perspektiven für die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit des Stipendiatischen Arbeitskreises Globale Entwicklung und postkoloniale Verhältnisse der Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES).

Do investor-state dispute settlement cases influence domestic environmental regulation? The role of respondent state bureaucratic capacity

Does international politics influence domestic politics? In the investment treaty regime, there is currently a debate about whether investor-state dispute settlement cases influence respondent state domestic regulation. We present a systematic test of this relationship. Using two unique datasets, we examine whether investor-state cases targeting environmental measures influence respondent states’ environmental regulation. We make two theoretical contributions. First, we present an integrated typology of potential regulatory responses to investor-state dispute settlement cases. Second, we propose a novel, conditional theory of regulatory responses to investor-state cases. We argue that states’ responses should depend on their bureaucratic capacity. In our analysis, we find that respondent state bureaucratic capacity conditions the relationship between investor-state cases and subsequent domestic regulation. There is a more pronounced negative relationship between investor-state cases and regulatory behavior in states with high bureaucratic capacity than in low-capacity states.

Do investor-state dispute settlement cases influence domestic environmental regulation? The role of respondent state bureaucratic capacity

Does international politics influence domestic politics? In the investment treaty regime, there is currently a debate about whether investor-state dispute settlement cases influence respondent state domestic regulation. We present a systematic test of this relationship. Using two unique datasets, we examine whether investor-state cases targeting environmental measures influence respondent states’ environmental regulation. We make two theoretical contributions. First, we present an integrated typology of potential regulatory responses to investor-state dispute settlement cases. Second, we propose a novel, conditional theory of regulatory responses to investor-state cases. We argue that states’ responses should depend on their bureaucratic capacity. In our analysis, we find that respondent state bureaucratic capacity conditions the relationship between investor-state cases and subsequent domestic regulation. There is a more pronounced negative relationship between investor-state cases and regulatory behavior in states with high bureaucratic capacity than in low-capacity states.

Do investor-state dispute settlement cases influence domestic environmental regulation? The role of respondent state bureaucratic capacity

Does international politics influence domestic politics? In the investment treaty regime, there is currently a debate about whether investor-state dispute settlement cases influence respondent state domestic regulation. We present a systematic test of this relationship. Using two unique datasets, we examine whether investor-state cases targeting environmental measures influence respondent states’ environmental regulation. We make two theoretical contributions. First, we present an integrated typology of potential regulatory responses to investor-state dispute settlement cases. Second, we propose a novel, conditional theory of regulatory responses to investor-state cases. We argue that states’ responses should depend on their bureaucratic capacity. In our analysis, we find that respondent state bureaucratic capacity conditions the relationship between investor-state cases and subsequent domestic regulation. There is a more pronounced negative relationship between investor-state cases and regulatory behavior in states with high bureaucratic capacity than in low-capacity states.

Claus Michelsen: „Corona-Pandemie bremst den Aufschwung weiter aus“

Die deutsche Wirtschaft ist nach Schätzung des Statistischen Bundesamtes im ersten Quartal deutlich geschrumpft. Dazu ein Statement von Claus Michelsen, Konjunkturchef des Deutschen Instituts für Wirtschaftsforschung (DIW Berlin):

Das heftige Wiederaufflammen der Corona-Pandemie hat die deutsche Wirtschaft im ersten Quartal erneut einbrechen lassen. Insgesamt sank die Wirtschaftsleistung im ersten Quartal dieses Jahres um 1,7 Prozent. Dies liegt im Rahmen der Erwartung.  

Damit ist die Wertschöpfung deutlich weniger stark zurückgegangen als im Frühjahr des letzten Jahres. Betroffen waren in erster Linie die Dienstleistungsbereiche, der Handel und die Gastronomie, die im ersten Quartal ihre Geschäftstätigkeit weitgehend einstellen mussten. Die Industrie hingegen hat kräftig gestützt – hier kam es anders als im vergangenen Jahr nicht zu größeren Unterbrechungen der Lieferketten. Gleichwohl verlief der Produktionsprozess nicht vollkommen störungsfrei: Automobilhersteller hatten einige Probleme bei der Beschaffung wichtiger Bauteile und auch die Blockade des Suezkanals hat kurzfristig zu Verzögerungen gesorgt.  

Dennoch stimmt die kräftige Nachfrage vor allem aus Fernost und den USA nach deutschen Maschinen und Anlagen aber auch nach Kraftfahrzeugen positiv für die weitere Entwicklung. Es scheint, als könnte sich die deutsche Wirtschaft abermals aus einer Krise heraus exportieren. Für eine nachhaltige Erholung ist die Bekämpfung der Pandemie zentral. Wichtig ist es, Instrumente für eine sichere Öffnung der Dienstleistungs- und Handelsbereich im Land zu finden und die Impfkampagne mit hohem Tempo voranzutreiben. Ansonsten droht eine lange Phase des Stop-and-go für die wirtschaftliche Erholung, wie es bereits jetzt zu beobachten ist.  

Der Silberstreif am Horizont ist der Impfschutz, der voraussichtlich in den Sommermonaten ausreichen wird, um die Corona-Pandemie in Deutschland zu stoppen. Der Erholungsprozess kann dann schnell einsetzten, wenn die Haushalte die Ersparnisse aus der Pandemiezeit ausgeben. Allerdings werden selbst dann nicht alle Unternehmen die Krise überleben. Unternehmensinsolvenzen könnten den Erholungsprozess weiter ausbremsen und Spuren auf dem Arbeitsmarkt hinterlassen.

Claudia Kemfert: „Bundesverfassungsgericht setzt klares Signal für Klimaschutz als Grundrechtsfrage“

Das Bundes-Klimaschutzgesetz greife zu kurz, urteilte heute das Bundesverfassungsgericht. Der Bund müsse nachbessern. Energieökonomin Claudia Kemfert, Leiterin der Abteilung Energie, Verkehr, Umwelt am Deutschen Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (DIW Berlin), kommentiert die Entscheidung des Bundesverfassungsgerichts wie folgt:

Die Entscheidung des Bundesverfassungsgerichts zum Bundes-Klimaschutzgesetz ist historisch und verdeutlicht, dass Klimaschutz eine Grundrechtsfrage ist. Vor allem zukünftige Generationen müssen demnach geschützt werden und dürfen nicht in ihren Freiheitsrechten beeinträchtigt werden. Das Bundesverfassungsgericht verlangt, dass die Klimaschutzziele für die kommenden Jahrzehnte, auch nach 2030, eindeutig definiert werden müssen, um künftige Generationen zu schützen. Die jetzige Gesetzeslegung schafft Fehlanreize, wenn nicht eindeutig definiert wird, wie die Treibhausgasemissionen bis zur vollständigen Emissionsvermeidung bis spätestens 2050 reduziert werden sollen. Die Karlsruher Richter haben völlig recht, wenn sie sagen, dass die bestehenden Vorschriften hohe Emissionsminderungslasten unumkehrbar auf die Zeiträume nach 2030 verschieben. Klimaschutz erfordert rasches Handeln und keine weitere Verzögerung, um die Grundrechte künftiger Generationen zu sichern. Wir benötigen neue Verträge, die sicherstellen, dass alle Nachhaltigkeits- und Klimaziele dauerhaft eingehalten werden.

Die Karlsruher Richter bestätigen zudem unsere Forschungsergebnisse im Sachverständigenrat für Umweltfragen, dass Klimaschutz im Einklang stehen muss mit einem maximalen Treibhausgasbudget, das bisher nicht ausreichend berücksichtigt wurde. Die Richter haben damit völlig zu Recht den notwendigen wissenschaftlichen Kenntnisstand als Grundlage für ihre Begründung aufgegriffen. Dieses Urteil schafft endlich juristische Klarheit und macht deutlich, wie bedeutsam der Klimaschutz für alle Generationen ist.

Pages

THIS IS THE NEW BETA VERSION OF EUROPA VARIETAS NEWS CENTER - under construction
the old site is here

Copy & Drop - Can`t find your favourite site? Send us the RSS or URL to the following address: info(@)europavarietas(dot)org.