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Practising organizational autonomy at the community level: evidence from advocacy projects in Uganda and Vietnam

Organizational autonomy is assumed to be a crucial prerequisite for well-functioning civil society organizations (CSOs). While the literature largely concentrates on how donors and governments constrain professional CSOs’ autonomy, this chapter focuses on sub-national organizations’ day-to-day engagement with the state and with the intermediary organizations that are funding them. By comparing how a Ugandan CSO and a provincial chapter of the Women’s Union in Vietnam practise autonomy, the chapter shows that autonomy, in itself, has no set value. Practising autonomy is relational, changes over time, and can take on different meanings. The observed relationships with state authorities were not exclusively constraining; they also enabled the organizations to implement politically sensitive projects at the community level. The chapter thus proposes that scholars and practitioners pay more attention to modes of collaboration at the intermediary–sub-national level nexus. This could, among other things, enable actors to capitalize on the advantages provided by adaptive management approaches.

Practising organizational autonomy at the community level: evidence from advocacy projects in Uganda and Vietnam

Organizational autonomy is assumed to be a crucial prerequisite for well-functioning civil society organizations (CSOs). While the literature largely concentrates on how donors and governments constrain professional CSOs’ autonomy, this chapter focuses on sub-national organizations’ day-to-day engagement with the state and with the intermediary organizations that are funding them. By comparing how a Ugandan CSO and a provincial chapter of the Women’s Union in Vietnam practise autonomy, the chapter shows that autonomy, in itself, has no set value. Practising autonomy is relational, changes over time, and can take on different meanings. The observed relationships with state authorities were not exclusively constraining; they also enabled the organizations to implement politically sensitive projects at the community level. The chapter thus proposes that scholars and practitioners pay more attention to modes of collaboration at the intermediary–sub-national level nexus. This could, among other things, enable actors to capitalize on the advantages provided by adaptive management approaches.

Practising organizational autonomy at the community level: evidence from advocacy projects in Uganda and Vietnam

Organizational autonomy is assumed to be a crucial prerequisite for well-functioning civil society organizations (CSOs). While the literature largely concentrates on how donors and governments constrain professional CSOs’ autonomy, this chapter focuses on sub-national organizations’ day-to-day engagement with the state and with the intermediary organizations that are funding them. By comparing how a Ugandan CSO and a provincial chapter of the Women’s Union in Vietnam practise autonomy, the chapter shows that autonomy, in itself, has no set value. Practising autonomy is relational, changes over time, and can take on different meanings. The observed relationships with state authorities were not exclusively constraining; they also enabled the organizations to implement politically sensitive projects at the community level. The chapter thus proposes that scholars and practitioners pay more attention to modes of collaboration at the intermediary–sub-national level nexus. This could, among other things, enable actors to capitalize on the advantages provided by adaptive management approaches.

Embrace multipolarity: Germany must act European for the Global Common Good

To promote a more peaceful world, Germany needs to move past primarily national strategies and start thinking European. The best way to do that: support a strong global role for the European Union.

Embrace multipolarity: Germany must act European for the Global Common Good

To promote a more peaceful world, Germany needs to move past primarily national strategies and start thinking European. The best way to do that: support a strong global role for the European Union.

Embrace multipolarity: Germany must act European for the Global Common Good

To promote a more peaceful world, Germany needs to move past primarily national strategies and start thinking European. The best way to do that: support a strong global role for the European Union.

Die Rechte indigener Gruppen und lokaler Gemeinschaften stärken und den Verlust der Artenvielfalt stoppen

Vom 7. bis 19. Dezember 2022 fand im kanadischen Montreal die 15. Konferenz der Vertragsparteien (COP) des Übereinkommens über die biologische Vielfalt (CBD) unter dem Vorsitz Chinas statt. Trotz der schwierigen geopolitischen Lage, konnten sich die Regierungen auf ein neues globales Rahmenwerk zur biologischen Vielfalt (Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework, GBF) einigen. Das neue Abkommen ist besonders wichtig um SDG 14 (Leben unter Wasser) und SDG 15 (Leben an Land) zu erreichen. Das in Montreal beschlossene Abkommen geht jedoch vielen Beobachter*innen nicht weit genug. Die Staaten müssen stärker mit indigenen Gruppen (indigenous peoples, IPs) und lokalen Gemeinschaften (local communities, LCs) zusammenarbeiten und von ihnen lernen, um das GBF umzusetzen. Besonders wichtig für IPs und LCs sind laut Minority Rights Groups International die Berücksichtigung eines menschenrechtsbasierten Ansatzes, die Anerkennung des Rechts auf freie, vorherige und informierte Zustimmung und die Anerkennung des Rechts auf eine saubere und gesunde Umwelt.

Die Rechte indigener Gruppen und lokaler Gemeinschaften stärken und den Verlust der Artenvielfalt stoppen

Vom 7. bis 19. Dezember 2022 fand im kanadischen Montreal die 15. Konferenz der Vertragsparteien (COP) des Übereinkommens über die biologische Vielfalt (CBD) unter dem Vorsitz Chinas statt. Trotz der schwierigen geopolitischen Lage, konnten sich die Regierungen auf ein neues globales Rahmenwerk zur biologischen Vielfalt (Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework, GBF) einigen. Das neue Abkommen ist besonders wichtig um SDG 14 (Leben unter Wasser) und SDG 15 (Leben an Land) zu erreichen. Das in Montreal beschlossene Abkommen geht jedoch vielen Beobachter*innen nicht weit genug. Die Staaten müssen stärker mit indigenen Gruppen (indigenous peoples, IPs) und lokalen Gemeinschaften (local communities, LCs) zusammenarbeiten und von ihnen lernen, um das GBF umzusetzen. Besonders wichtig für IPs und LCs sind laut Minority Rights Groups International die Berücksichtigung eines menschenrechtsbasierten Ansatzes, die Anerkennung des Rechts auf freie, vorherige und informierte Zustimmung und die Anerkennung des Rechts auf eine saubere und gesunde Umwelt.

Die Rechte indigener Gruppen und lokaler Gemeinschaften stärken und den Verlust der Artenvielfalt stoppen

Vom 7. bis 19. Dezember 2022 fand im kanadischen Montreal die 15. Konferenz der Vertragsparteien (COP) des Übereinkommens über die biologische Vielfalt (CBD) unter dem Vorsitz Chinas statt. Trotz der schwierigen geopolitischen Lage, konnten sich die Regierungen auf ein neues globales Rahmenwerk zur biologischen Vielfalt (Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework, GBF) einigen. Das neue Abkommen ist besonders wichtig um SDG 14 (Leben unter Wasser) und SDG 15 (Leben an Land) zu erreichen. Das in Montreal beschlossene Abkommen geht jedoch vielen Beobachter*innen nicht weit genug. Die Staaten müssen stärker mit indigenen Gruppen (indigenous peoples, IPs) und lokalen Gemeinschaften (local communities, LCs) zusammenarbeiten und von ihnen lernen, um das GBF umzusetzen. Besonders wichtig für IPs und LCs sind laut Minority Rights Groups International die Berücksichtigung eines menschenrechtsbasierten Ansatzes, die Anerkennung des Rechts auf freie, vorherige und informierte Zustimmung und die Anerkennung des Rechts auf eine saubere und gesunde Umwelt.

Host community attitudes towards internally displaced persons: evidence from Al-Bab, Syria

Considering the unique context of the Al-Bab area in Syria hosting Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), we tested the role of economic individual self-interest in shaping a host community’s attitude towards IDPs. The findings from analyzing data collected from 496 households indicated that self-interest had a significant effect on their attitudes. Interestingly, when positive and negative attitudes were isolated from each other, the findings revealed that the factors shaping the former may not always be the same for the latter. The particular value of this study is in exploring the host community’s attitude towards IDPs, something which has not been studied and thus contributes to enhancing our knowledge about the attitude towards newcomers.

Host community attitudes towards internally displaced persons: evidence from Al-Bab, Syria

Considering the unique context of the Al-Bab area in Syria hosting Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), we tested the role of economic individual self-interest in shaping a host community’s attitude towards IDPs. The findings from analyzing data collected from 496 households indicated that self-interest had a significant effect on their attitudes. Interestingly, when positive and negative attitudes were isolated from each other, the findings revealed that the factors shaping the former may not always be the same for the latter. The particular value of this study is in exploring the host community’s attitude towards IDPs, something which has not been studied and thus contributes to enhancing our knowledge about the attitude towards newcomers.

Host community attitudes towards internally displaced persons: evidence from Al-Bab, Syria

Considering the unique context of the Al-Bab area in Syria hosting Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), we tested the role of economic individual self-interest in shaping a host community’s attitude towards IDPs. The findings from analyzing data collected from 496 households indicated that self-interest had a significant effect on their attitudes. Interestingly, when positive and negative attitudes were isolated from each other, the findings revealed that the factors shaping the former may not always be the same for the latter. The particular value of this study is in exploring the host community’s attitude towards IDPs, something which has not been studied and thus contributes to enhancing our knowledge about the attitude towards newcomers.

On the effects of transfer pricing regulations: a developing country perspective

Multinational profit shifting by mis-pricing of intra-firm trade is a major concern for less developed countries (LDCs). Many have enacted transfer pricing rules in order to constrain this type of tax avoidance behavior.  Yet, not much is known on the rules' fiscal and economic effects. We offer a first empirical assessment, drawing on data for more than 120 low and middle income countries for a 30-year-period. Our results suggest that the introduction of transfer pricing regulations significantly increased corporate tax revenue collection in LDCs. The effect is fiscally sizable but fades out over time. We do not find indication for negative investment responses to the regulations.

On the effects of transfer pricing regulations: a developing country perspective

Multinational profit shifting by mis-pricing of intra-firm trade is a major concern for less developed countries (LDCs). Many have enacted transfer pricing rules in order to constrain this type of tax avoidance behavior.  Yet, not much is known on the rules' fiscal and economic effects. We offer a first empirical assessment, drawing on data for more than 120 low and middle income countries for a 30-year-period. Our results suggest that the introduction of transfer pricing regulations significantly increased corporate tax revenue collection in LDCs. The effect is fiscally sizable but fades out over time. We do not find indication for negative investment responses to the regulations.

On the effects of transfer pricing regulations: a developing country perspective

Multinational profit shifting by mis-pricing of intra-firm trade is a major concern for less developed countries (LDCs). Many have enacted transfer pricing rules in order to constrain this type of tax avoidance behavior.  Yet, not much is known on the rules' fiscal and economic effects. We offer a first empirical assessment, drawing on data for more than 120 low and middle income countries for a 30-year-period. Our results suggest that the introduction of transfer pricing regulations significantly increased corporate tax revenue collection in LDCs. The effect is fiscally sizable but fades out over time. We do not find indication for negative investment responses to the regulations.

Le Traité de l'Élysée, la réconciliation franco-allemande et la construction de l'Europe : mythe et réalités

Fondation Robert Schuman / Publication - Mon, 23/01/2023 - 01:00
Schuman vs. de Gaulle "Pendant la visite du Général de Gaulle la semaine dernière, j'ai pensé souvent à vous, l'homme qui a posé, par sa proposition de créer la Communauté Européenne du Charbon et de l'Acier, les fondements de l'amitié qui désormais allait lier si étroitement nos deux pays l'un ...

A la une !, La relation franco-allemande, une impérieuse nécessité

Fondation Robert Schuman / Actualités - Mon, 23/01/2023 - 01:00
Le président français Emmanuel Macron et le chancelier allemand Olaf Scholz ont relancé leur entente avec force symboles, mais sans cacher les nuances et les divergences, le 22 janvier à l'occasion du 60ème anniversaire du traité de l'Elysée. Ils offrent ainsi aux Européens plus que des perspectives, de vraies chances pour l'avenir, écrit Jean-Dominique Giuliani.

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