You are here

Diplomacy & Crisis News

Citation du jour : « Pauvreté et inégalités à l’horizon 2030 »

Politique étrangère (IFRI) - Fri, 17/05/2019 - 10:28

Le nouveau numéro de Politique étrangère (n° 1/2019) vient de paraître :
2019-2029 – Quel monde dans 10 ans ?

Découvrez quotidiennement un extrait de l’un des articles de ce nouveau numéro.

Cette citation est extraite de l’article de Ravi Kanbur, « Pauvreté et inégalités à l’horizon 2030 », publié dans le n° 1/2019 de Politique étrangère.

Retrouvez le sommaire complet ici.

> > Suivez-nous sur Twitter : @Pol_Etrangere ! < <

Citation du jour : « L’avenir du système monétaire et financier international »

Politique étrangère (IFRI) - Thu, 16/05/2019 - 09:49

Le nouveau numéro de Politique étrangère (n° 1/2019) vient de paraître :
2019-2029 – Quel monde dans 10 ans ?

Découvrez quotidiennement un extrait de l’un des articles de ce nouveau numéro.

Cette citation est extraite de l’article de Jean-Claude Trichet, « L’avenir du système monétaire et financier international », publié dans le n° 1/2019 de Politique étrangère.

Retrouvez le sommaire complet ici.

> > Suivez-nous sur Twitter : @Pol_Etrangere ! < <

Citation du jour : « 2029, la grande renaissance asiatique »

Politique étrangère (IFRI) - Wed, 15/05/2019 - 09:30

Le nouveau numéro de Politique étrangère (n° 1/2019) vient de paraître :
2019-2029 – Quel monde dans 10 ans ?

Découvrez quotidiennement un extrait de l’un des articles de ce nouveau numéro.

Cette citation est extraite de l’article de Kishore Mahbubani, « 2029, la grande renaissance asiatique », publié dans le n° 1/2019 de Politique étrangère.

Retrouvez le sommaire complet ici.

> > Suivez-nous sur Twitter : @Pol_Etrangere ! < <

Citation du jour : « Le Moyen-Orient en 2029 »

Politique étrangère (IFRI) - Tue, 14/05/2019 - 09:30

Le nouveau numéro de Politique étrangère (n° 1/2019) vient de paraître :
2019-2029 – Quel monde dans 10 ans ?

Découvrez quotidiennement un extrait de l’un des articles de ce nouveau numéro.

Cette citation est extraite de l’article de Fawaz A. Gerges, « Le Moyen-Orient en 2029 », publié dans le n° 1/2019 de Politique étrangère.

Retrouvez le sommaire complet ici.

> > Suivez-nous sur Twitter : @Pol_Etrangere ! < <

Citation du jour : « Les Afriques en 2029 »

Politique étrangère (IFRI) - Mon, 13/05/2019 - 09:30

Le nouveau numéro de Politique étrangère (n° 1/2019) vient de paraître :
2019-2029 – Quel monde dans 10 ans ?

Découvrez quotidiennement un extrait de l’un des articles de ce nouveau numéro.

Cette citation est extraite de l’article d’Alioune Sall, « Les Afriques  en 2029 », publié dans le n° 1/2019 de Politique étrangère.

Retrouvez le sommaire complet ici.

> > Suivez-nous sur Twitter : @Pol_Etrangere ! < <

Citation du jour : « L’Europe dans dix ans »

Politique étrangère (IFRI) - Fri, 10/05/2019 - 09:30

Le nouveau numéro de Politique étrangère (n° 1/2019) vient de paraître :
2019-2029 – Quel monde dans 10 ans ?

Découvrez quotidiennement un extrait de l’un des articles de ce nouveau numéro.

Cette citation est extraite de l’article de Nicole Gnesotto, « L’Europe dans dix ans », publié dans le n° 1/2019 de Politique étrangère.

Retrouvez le sommaire complet ici.

> > Suivez-nous sur Twitter : @Pol_Etrangere ! < <

Citation du jour : « Entre concentration et dispersion : le bel avenir de la puissance »

Politique étrangère (IFRI) - Thu, 09/05/2019 - 09:30

Le nouveau numéro de Politique étrangère (n° 1/2019) vient de paraître :
2019-2029 – Quel monde dans 10 ans ?

Découvrez quotidiennement un extrait de l’un des articles de ce nouveau numéro.

Cette citation est extraite de l’article de Thomas Gomart, directeur de l’Ifri,
« Entre concentration et dispersion : le bel avenir de la puissance », publié dans le n° 1/2019 de Politique étrangère. Lisez l’article dans son intégralité ici.

Retrouvez le sommaire complet ici.

> > Suivez-nous sur Twitter : @Pol_Etrangere ! < <

Citation du jour : « Quand la technologie façonne le monde… »

Politique étrangère (IFRI) - Wed, 08/05/2019 - 09:30

Le nouveau numéro de Politique étrangère (n° 1/2019) vient de paraître :
2019-2029 – Quel monde dans 10 ans ?

Découvrez quotidiennement un extrait de l’un des articles de ce nouveau numéro.

Cette citation est extraite de l’article de Jared Cohen, « Quand la technologie façonne le monde… », publié dans le n° 1/2019 de Politique étrangère.

Retrouvez le sommaire complet ici.

> > Suivez-nous sur Twitter : @Pol_Etrangere ! < <

Citation du jour : « Après l’explosion démographique »

Politique étrangère (IFRI) - Tue, 07/05/2019 - 09:30

Le nouveau numéro de Politique étrangère (n° 1/2019) vient de paraître :
2019-2029 – Quel monde dans 10 ans ?

Découvrez quotidiennement un extrait de l’un des articles de ce nouveau numéro.

Cette citation est extraite de l’article d’Hervé Le Bras, « Après l’explosion démographique », publié dans le n° 1/2019 de Politique étrangère.

Retrouvez le sommaire complet ici.

> > Suivez-nous sur Twitter : @Pol_Etrangere ! < <

Citation du jour : « Le crépuscule de l’universel »

Politique étrangère (IFRI) - Mon, 06/05/2019 - 09:30

Le nouveau numéro de Politique étrangère (n° 1/2019) vient de paraître :
2019-2029 – Quel monde dans 10 ans ?

Découvrez quotidiennement un extrait de l’un des articles de ce nouveau numéro.

Cette citation est extraite de l’article de Chantal Delsol, « Le crépuscule de l’universel », publié dans le n° 1/2019 de Politique étrangère. Découvrez son article en entier ici.

Retrouvez le sommaire complet ici.

> > Suivez-nous sur Twitter : @Pol_Etrangere ! < <

U.S. Air Force F-22s, F-16s, and F-15s Just Did a "Dispersal Exercise"

The National Interest - Thu, 25/04/2019 - 04:00

David Axe

Security,

And China is the most likely reason why. 

The U.S. Air Force on April 22, 2019 practiced spreading out its warplanes across the Pacific region in order to make it harder for Chinese forces to target them.

Actually, preparing for bad weather was the main official justification. But the “dispersal exercise” also is part of an evolving Pentagon plan for waging high-tech war against China. American forces would spread out to dodge Chinese attack, then gather to conduct their own attacks.

“Pacific Air Forces airmen and aircraft from across the command joined together at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam ... to participate in a dispersal exercise throughout Micronesia,” the Air Force reported.

The exercise, named Resilient Typhoon, is designed to validate PACAF’s ability to adapt to rapidly developing events, like inclement weather, while maintaining readiness in support of allied and partner nations throughout the region.

The exercise tests PACAF’s ability to execute flight operations from multiple locations in order to maintain readiness and involves airmen and aircraft concentrated in one place – Andersen AFB – separating via a dispersal, recovering and then rapidly resuming operations at airports and airfields in: Guam, Tinian, Saipan, The Federated States of Micronesia … and Palau.

A wide range of aircraft participated in the exercise, including F-16s from Misawa air base in Japan, F-15Cs from Kadena, C-130Js from Japan’s Yokota air base and C-17s and F-22s from Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.

A separate but parallel Air Force concept helps squadrons quickly to move small groups of warplanes.

“Operational environments and global threats evolve rapidly,” said Brig. Gen. Michael Winkler, PACAF director of strategy, plans and programs. “We must ensure that all forward-deployed forces are ready for a potential contingency with little notice and that we can move more fluidly across the theater to seize, retain and exploit the initiative in any environment.”

Read full article

Underwater Coffins: These 5 Submarines Quite Simply Are the Worst Ever

The National Interest - Thu, 25/04/2019 - 02:32

James Holmes

Security,

Just sad subs. 

Rather than inflict mayhem on U.S. logistics--much as the German Navy did in the Atlantic, and much as the U.S. Navy did against Japanese sea lanes in the Western Pacific--the IJN allowed transports, tankers, and other vital but unsexy shipping to pass to and fro unmolested. Vast quantities of American war materiel traversed the broad Pacific--letting American forces surmount the tyranny of distance.

What a drag. Top Gun was about the best of the best flitting around the skies, kept aloft by a lonely impulse of delight. This list of History's Worst 5 Submarines catalogues the worst of the worst lumbering around in the briny deep. Such a vessel is a millstone dragging down the fortunes of its navy, its parent military, or the society that puts it to sea.

(This first appeared several years ago.)

Call it Bottom Gun.

Now, it's possible to rank hardware, including submersibles and their armament, purely by technical characteristics. The crummiest piece of kit -- condemned by shoddy design, faulty construction work, or premature obsolescence -- is the bottom-feeder on such a list. In the case of submarines, then, tallying up speed, submerged endurance, acoustic properties, and kindred statistics offers a reputable way to proceed. But it tells only part of the story.

Carl von Clausewitz, that doughty purveyor of strategic wisdom, helps reveal the rest. Clausewitz defines strength as a product of force and resolve, affirming that people -- not machines -- compete for supremacy. The weapon or platform is just an implement. Both material and human factors, consequently, are crucial to success in strategic competition or war. You can't judge the best of the best or the worst of the worst by widgets alone.

Read full article

Vaccinations create ‘umbrella of immunity’ against global measles outbreaks, says UNICEF

UN News Centre - Thu, 25/04/2019 - 02:26
Between 2010 and 2017, an average of 21.1 million children missed their first dose of the measles vaccine, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) revealed on Wednesday, stressing its importance to creating “an umbrella of immunity for everyone.” 

The Army Is Getting Serious About a New Scout Helicopter

The National Interest - Thu, 25/04/2019 - 02:03

David Axe

Security,

The U.S. Army on April 23, 2019 awarded contracts to five companies to develop prototypes for the ground-combat branch’s new scout helicopter.

The U.S. Army on April 23, 2019 awarded contracts to five companies to develop prototypes for the ground-combat branch’s new scout helicopter.

AVX, Bell, Boeing, Karem and Lockheed Martin each snagged a development contract for the Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft program. FARA aims to provide the Army a new scout helicopter finally to replace the old Bell OH-58D Kiowa Warrior scouts the service retired in 2017.

The FARA rotorcraft also will free up hundreds of Boeing AH-64 Apache attack helicopters that the Army has pressed into the scout role despite the Apache being too big, slow and heavy for the role.

To adequately replace both the OH-58D and the AH-64, the new copter will need to carry sophisticated sensors and a heavy load of long-range weapons. It will need to be able to fly for hours at a time at speeds fast enough to evade enemy defenses, all in hot-and-high conditions that can sap a rotorcraft's lifting power.

It also will need to be tough, reliable and affordable.

The Army in 2018 announced a plan for a fly-off between FARA candidates. The branch wants the new copter to enter service no later than 2028. By military standards, that’s soon. And the five builders are in different states of readiness for the imminent fly-off.

Texas-based AVX plans to offer a version of its Joint Multi-Role helicopter, a stubby rotorcraft with ducted fans in place of the tail boom. “The AVX design offers the capabilities the Army wants for the future fleet of utility and attack aircraft at a very attractive price,” AVX stated.

“The AVX JMR aircraft has entry doors on both sides of the fuselage as well as a large rear ramp for easy cargo handling. Additionally it has retractable landing gear and the attack variant … carries all armaments stored inside until needed which provides a ‘clean’ aerodynamic design.”

Bell, also headquartered in Texas, reportedly will offer a conventional rotorcraft based on its Bell 525 utility copter.

Read full article

Trump’s Support for Haftar Won’t Help Libya

Foreign Policy - Thu, 25/04/2019 - 00:31
The United States should be working to help negotiate peace rather than fanning the flames of another failed war. 

‘You can and should do more’ to include people with disabilities, wheelchair-bound Syrian advocate tells Security Council in searing speech

UN News Centre - Wed, 24/04/2019 - 23:52
The UN Security Council was told on Wednesday that people with disabilities “can’t wait any longer” for more of a say in how the world’s top diplomatic forum for peace and security, factors their needs into its work. 

Who Controls Libya’s Airports Controls Libya

Foreign Policy - Wed, 24/04/2019 - 23:51
The battle for control over critical infrastructure shows who might win the civil war.

How a Jew Won Over the Land of the Cossacks

Foreign Policy - Wed, 24/04/2019 - 21:46
Under threat from Russia, national identity in Ukraine has overpowered religious and ethnic differences.

Wednesday’s Daily Brief: Diplomacy for Peace Day, #VaccinesWork, the cost of war on Afghans, tech and well-being

UN News Centre - Wed, 24/04/2019 - 21:29
Top news for Wednesday includes: the first-ever International Day of Multilateralism and Diplomacy for Peace, the launch of World Immunization Week, civilians continuing to bear the brunt of ongoing violence in Afghanistan, the need for more regulation in the tech industry, a call for more exercise and less screen time for children, and a plea by the UN refugees High Commissioner not to let extremism divide us. 

Britain Can’t Afford to Keep Talking About Brexit

Foreign Policy - Wed, 24/04/2019 - 21:15
The never-ending conversation about leaving the EU has stalled all other progress on economic policy.

Pages