You are here

Diplomacy & Defense Think Tank News

A European Economic Policy in the Making

SWP - Thu, 29/10/2020 - 00:00

Although the roots of the European Union lie in economic integration, the EU’s economic policy competences and possibilities are narrowly limited in European primary law. Nevertheless, the influence of the EU, and in particular the European Commission, on economic policies of the member states is clearly visible and tangible.

The focus of European economic policy is on the coordination of member state policies by the European Commission. It uses strategic planning in­struments such as 10-year strategies, guidelines, and reform recommen­dations, which it bundles within the European Semester.

European economic policy-makers are actually faced with the task of limiting the acute socio-economic consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic on the one hand, and finding answers to the structural challenges posed by globalisation, digitisation, and climate change on the other. A com­mon European economic policy is becoming increasingly necessary, and expectations are growing.

The European Commission is trying to combine these two tasks – the stimulation of the European economy and the sustainable transformation of national economies – with the new European recovery fund “Next Generation EU”. The European Green Deal will become the guiding prin­ciple for both economic policy coordination and economic policy at the national level.

This reorientation of European economic policy towards sustainable and decarbonised growth will promote the Europeanisation and, in the long term, the unitarisation of national economic policies.

 

 

Taking Stock of Recent Operational Reform and Adaptation in UN Peacekeeping

European Peace Institute / News - Wed, 28/10/2020 - 15:00
Event Video: 
Photos

jQuery(document).ready(function(){jQuery("#isloaderfor-ezfbjx").fadeOut(2000, function () { jQuery(".pagwrap-ezfbjx").fadeIn(1000);});});

Several United Nations peacekeeping missions are deployed in highly complex environments, marked by stalled political agreements, significant protection challenges, direct threats to the security of peacekeepers, vast theaters of operations, and a range of partners. Many of the challenges faced by these missions underscore how contemporary armed conflict is evolving. In response, peacekeeping has had to evolve.

On October 28th, IPI, with cosponsors the Permanent Missions of Sweden and Egypt to the UN, held a virtual panel discussion on how the operational capabilities of contemporary UN peacekeeping are changing; whether these reforms are yielding the desired effects; what impact these changes have on peace operations’ ability to effectively deliver on their mandates; and what more needs to be done to maintain momentum for reform.

Anna Karin Enestrøm, the Permanent Representative of Sweden to the UN, acknowledged that “significant efforts” were already underway to reform peacekeeping in doctrine and in resourcing missions with funding, personal equipment, and technology. But lagging behind, she said, were actions expanding the participation of women. “We must act now to increase the number of civilian and uniformed women in peacekeeping at all levels and in key positions. As of May 2020, only 5.4 % of the United Nations military and 15.1% of the police personnel were women, compared to 3% and 10%, respectively, in 2015. This pace is simply too slow. We must redouble our effort to implement the Women, Peace and Security agenda in peacekeeping.”

Mohamed Fathi Ahmed Edrees, Permanent Representative of Egypt to the UN, spoke of how the COVID-19 pandemic had impacted peacekeeping and made even more urgent the need for reforms. “The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the peacemaking reality and worsened the already complex environments where peacekeepers are deployed. This new reality requires collective efforts from all peacekeeping stakeholders to adapt and further advance A4P (Action for Peacekeeping) implementation.”

General Dennis Gyllensporre, Force Commander, UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) said there were two rationales behind the adaptation in his mission. “The first one is the threat situation that we experience in the country to the civilian population, but also to the personnel of MINUSMA, where we are a target for some of these illegal armed groups, and also more recently, the very fluid situation that we have at the political level with the coup in August, translating, in some respects, to unrest on the ground.

“The second reason why the adaptation was necessary for us was the fact that the Security Council decided in its most recent mandate renewal that we would have another additional strategic priority to focus on the center of the country in addition to supporting the implementation of the peace accord. Basically, we have to do more with the same resources because there was no added resource that came with this priority. The Security Council also outlined the need for doing a mission-wide adaptation, and it’s not just the military part, but all the pillars of the mission. And now we are in the process of implementing the COVID-19 situation—obviously an obstacle, a delaying factor. Nevertheless, we’ve taken steps forward.”

He explained that those steps dealt with the three pillars: protection, posture, and partnering. On the posture, he reported that in addition to performing its traditional peacekeeping role with infantry battalions providing area coverage and trying to understand what’s happening on the ground, the mission had added a mobile component to the force so it could concentrate forces in certain areas for limited periods. “From that point of view, we are also in the process of generating and getting new capabilities, more aviation, more intelligence collection assets to make sure the composition reflects this new posture.” General Gyllensporre said that in addition to the change in composition, this represented “a change in mindset for us to conduct our operations more proactively and engaging with the population, engaging with other stakeholders, and leading the way if needed.”

As for protection, he said the mission had an approach that was more “population-centric.” In military terms, he explained, that meant acting from temporary operating bases to ensure that there are soldiers present continuously in the vicinity of exposed villages and areas where the threat to the population is thought to be imminent. “And we also make sure that we employ intelligence as a driving factor for operations. The ability to protect has to start with a good intelligence assessment from all components of the mission.”

On the subject of partnering, he said, “This is the way to leverage the efforts of the mission, making sure that the Malian authorities, civilians and military, are stepping up and extending their responsibilities in the areas that are threatened.” He added that the mission had a mandate to provide support for “partner forces” like the Malian armed forces and the G5 Sahel. He said that though the reform process was in its early stages, he was encouraged by the positive response from the local population and local leaders. “When we are able to come in quick, insert soldiers and provide some assistance, that is a good indicator that this adaptation is indeed the right way to go.”

Rania Dagash, Chief of the Policy and Best Practices Service, Department of Peace Operations, shared details of adaptations at three UN missions. She said that MINUSMA had developed an SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) on early warning and rapid response, “two mechanisms that help us respond better. A rapid verification and dissemination of early warning information is critical based on what the Force Commander just said about the constantly shifting nature of the threat.”

She said that MINUSCA, the UN mission in the Central African Republic, has created joint special security units to demobilize armed group combatants. “What this joint special security unit does is establish mixed units, including CAR’s military and armed group elements to jointly carry out security. The training of these units has been completed, and they have already been dispatched to boost protection.” In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, she said, MONUSCO has increased connections between its far-flung field offices. “What this has led to is increased coordination on threat analysis and response between field missions, and a senior management group on provincial protection was held.”

Major General Jai Shanker Menon, Director, Office for Peacekeeping Strategic Partnerships, pointed out that the reforms decentralize the management of resources to senior managers in the field who have mandate implementation responsibilities and direct responsibility for the safety and security of peacekeepers. He pronounced this “a positive development that can have an impact on the ground.

Now, for this to be effective, definitely the mindset of those in UN headquarters needs to shift from one of directing missions to one of truly acting in a support role to the missions.”

General Menon said his own experience of commanding missions had taught him the value of leadership and decisive decision-making. “In my opinion, there should be absolutely no procrastination. Decisions must be given after due thought, but they must be capped with the limit of time and information. A bad decision may be better than no decision at all. In my present job, I often see a lot of systemic issues in the mission like trauma care, base defense, integrated offices not working together, and these often stem from a lack of giving simple and clear-cut decisions.”

The two essential talents that UN mission leaders must have, he said, were “political acumen” and managerial ability. “Leaders must be multi-skilled to run a multi-dimensional peacekeeping operation and must possess managerial skills. Leaders must preferably have previous UN experience to understand the organization, its functioning, and the myriad policies, rules and regulations. Trust me, it can be overwhelming the number of policies, rules and regulations that come flying at you when you’re trying to run a mission.” He lamented that the UN didn’t have enough job mobility and clear career paths to better develop more seasoned leaders and weed out potential failures.

Ihab Awad, Deputy Foreign Minister of Egypt, chose to focus on MINUSMA where Egypt is a major troop-contributing country. “The MINUSMA adaptation plan was an important step forward to reorient the focus and operational capabilities of the mission, but it’s still a work in progress and, given the recent turmoil in Mali following the election, perhaps there is a need to continue to ensure that the adaptation plan is actually adapted to the emerging political and operational challenges facing the mission. So while there is a plan in place, I would like to really call on adapting this adaptation to the version of the realities.”

Ambassador Awad brought up the great variances in the country contexts in which UN missions operate. “This is where the reforms of peacekeeping will actually make a difference, and those are different contexts that require different context-specific adaptation of both the mandate, operation capabilities, and resources.”

In the question and answer period, General Menon had what sounded like the last word. “What the organization, what we need to do is to adapt faster. More flexibility, more adaptability. We need to get the capabilities faster, otherwise the situation and the environment will keep changing. And your force adaptation plan, like someone said, will have to be further adapted.”

Moderating the discussion was Jake Sherman, IPI Senior Director of Programs.

.content .main .entry-header.w-thumbnail .cartouche {background: none; bottom: 0px;} h1.entry-title {font-size: 1.8em;}

China Trends #7 - Briser les chaînes de l’innovation ?

Institut Montaigne - Wed, 28/10/2020 - 11:12

Dans les débats chinois sur l’avenir de la politique économique du pays au cours de la prochaine décennie, et sur la manière de faire valoir les intérêts de la Chine dans la guerre commerciale et technologique avec les États-Unis — in fine, sur comment vaincre les États-Unis dans la compétition pour l'hégémonie mondiale —, "l’innovation" semble être perçue comme la solution unique à tous les maux de la Chine. Cette prise de conscience de la…

Comment se débarrasser de la mycose des pieds ?

RMES - Wed, 28/10/2020 - 09:07

La mycose des pieds est une infection fongique qui touche 10 % de la population française. Démangeaison des orteils, ongles de pieds très épaissis, vous soupçonnez une mycose. Pour vous en débarrasser et redonner forme humaine à vos pieds, plusieurs sont les solutions que vous pourriez exploiter. Une fois expérimentées, certaines précautions vous permettront de définitivement dire adieu à cette maladie qui ne vous rend pas fière de vos pieds au moment de les étaler pendant le doux soleil d’été.

La mycose plantaire est contagieuse. C’est pourquoi il est conseillé d’appliquer les soins nécessaires aussitôt que vous constatez l’apparition des lésions entre les orteils. Des médicaments existent pour ce faire. Premièrement, procédez au traitement par voie naturelle.

Les antifongiques

Ils sont réputés dans le traitement des mycoses. Gel, spray, crème, les antifongiques sont disponibles en de multiples formats. Il existe même des formats vernis. L’application devra se faire après un nettoyage rigoureux de vos pieds. En guise de précaution, lavez minutieusement vos mains avant l’application pour écarter toute autre contamination et juste après. La durée du traitement n’est pas le même chez tout le monde. Ainsi, il peut prendre un mois dans certains cas, une année entière dans d’autres.

Quelle que soit la durée du traitement, ne l’interrompez sous aucun prétexte, au risque de voir le champion récidiver. Bonne nouvelle ! Il existe un traitement unique à base de solution antimycosique administrée en une seule application pour se débarrasser une fois pour de bon de l’infection. Il n’est cependant réservé qu’aux adultes. De même, les deux pieds devront y passer et devront être gardés hors d’atteinte de toute humidité pendant 24 heures.

Un traitement oral

Si les antifongiques ne vous satisfont pas, il est conseillé de consulter votre podologue qui éventuellement pourra vous prescrire des médicaments. Ce traitement oral peut s’étendre sur une période de deux à six semaines.

L’automédication

Certains traitements sont possibles sans ordonnance. Il suffit de juste remplir une fiche en ligne pour s’en procurer. À titre d’exemple, le fluoconazone, le terbiunafil, le diflucan, et le lamisil sont très efficaces contre les infections fongiques. Il existe également des vernis antifongiques connus pour leur vertu curative dans le traitement des ongles infectés.

Un traitement naturel

Il s’agit du traitement au bicarbonate de soude. Deux possibilités s’offrent à vous. Premièrement, ajoutez quelques gouttes d’eau au bicarbonate de manière à obtenir une pâte. Appliquez-la sur la mycose. Laissez reposer pendant dix minutes, rincez puis appliquez une petite poudre de bicarbonate une fois la partie sèche. Secundo, faites un bain de pied aux bicarbonates de soude. Trempez-y vos pieds 15 à 20 minutes puis sortez-les de la cuvette – à ce propos, vous savez qu’il existe des produits conçus pour vous aider à améliorer cette expérience ?Je vous recommande de cliquer sur ce lien.

L’aromathérapie ou traitement par les huiles essentielles

Ces extraits de plantes possèdent des propriétés antifongiques. Il s’agit des huiles essentielles comme celles de :

  • De l’arbre à thé
  • D’eucalyptus glonulus
  • De lavande
  • De géranium rosat

Il suffit de les appliquer trois fois par jour sur la mycose. Rincez quelques minutes après chaque application – à propos … Comment fonctionne un diffuseur d’huile essentielle ?

La phytothérapie

Il s’agit du traitement par les teintures. Certaines d’entre elles possèdent de véritables propriétés antifongiques, surtout sur les peaux glabres. La teinture mère de calendula à utiliser en double application journalière sur la lésion. Après un mois, vous serez débarrassé de vos infections. La teinture de propolis également peut faire l’affaire.

Le traitement par homéopathie

Plus pour la prévention contre les cas de récidives, ce traitement vient renforcer celui fait par les antifongiques.

L’article Comment se débarrasser de la mycose des pieds ? est apparu en premier sur RMES.

Marcel Fratzscher: „Selektiver Shutdown schützt Gesundheit und Wirtschaft“

Bund und Länder haben neue Maßnahmen zur Eindämmung der Corona-Pandemie beschlossen. Dazu ein Statement von DIW-Präsident Marcel Fratzscher:

Die Entscheidung für einen selektiven Shutdown ist klug und schützt nicht nur die Gesundheit der Menschen, sondern auch die Wirtschaft. Diese Entscheidung ist zwar längst überfällig und hätte bereits vor zwei Wochen getroffen werden sollen, aber sie ist hoffentlich nun ausreichend um die zweite Infektionswelle genauso erfolgreich zu stoppen wie die erste. Die Politik hat die richtigen Lehren aus der ersten Infektionswelle gezogen und hält zunächst Schulen und Kitas offen. Die offene Frage ist, ob die Maßnahmen auf eine ausreichend große Akzeptanz stoßen, so dass diese Regeln auch überall umgesetzt werden. Hierfür muss die Politik wieder mehr mit einer Stimme sprechen und ihre Streitigkeiten und den angehenden Wahlkampf hinten anstellen. Die Wirtschaft bremst bereits seit Wochen stark ab. Die beschlossenen Restriktionen werden einige Branchen der Wirtschaft hart treffen, werden aber die Gesamtwirtschaft und die meisten Branchen wirtschaftlich schützen. Die zusätzlichen Wirtschaftshilfen für die am stärksten betroffenen Branchen sind gut und angemessen. Trotzdem ist zu befürchten, dass die deutsche Wirtschaft durch eine starke zweite Infektionswelle wieder in den Abschwung getrieben wird. Ob das verhindert werden kann, hängt von der Konsequenz ab, mit der die Maßnahmen umgesetzt und von den Menschen akzeptiert werden. Der größte Schaden für die deutsche Wirtschaft entsteht durch eine starke, lang anhaltende zweite Infektionswelle – nicht durch gezielte Beschränkungen des täglichen Lebens. Zeit und Vertrauen sind die beiden kritischen Faktoren für die Wirtschaft. Je länger eine zweite Infektionswelle anhält, und je weniger Politik und Wirtschaft Kontrolle über die Lage haben, desto stärker wird das Vertrauen der Menschen sinken.

Chile auf dem Weg zu einer neuen Verfassung

SWP - Wed, 28/10/2020 - 00:00

Die profunde Unzufriedenheit der chilenischen Bevölkerung mit der tradierten Politik und der geltenden Wirtschaftsordnung hatten seit Oktober 2019 zu Demonstrationen und gewaltsamen Ausschreitungen in der Andenrepublik geführt. Im Ergebnis einigten sich die traditionellen politischen Parteien auf ein »Übereinkommen für den sozialen Frieden und die neue Verfassung«, das unter anderem die Durchführung eines bindenden Referendums über die Eröffnung eines Verfassungsprozesses vorsah.

Am letzten Sonntag nun stimmten 78,27 Prozent der Wählerinnen und Wähler dafür, dass das Land eine neue Verfassung erhält. Diese soll, auch dafür hat sich mit 78,99 Prozent eine deutliche Mehrheit ausgesprochen, eine direkt gewählte Verfassungsgebende Versammlung erarbeiten. Damit werden viele der zivilgesellschaftlichen Forderungen, die im Zuge der Demonstrationen erhoben wurden, institutionell aufgegriffen und diskutiert. Dass nur rund 51 Prozent der Wählerschaft an die Urnen gingen und sich damit der Trend niedriger Wahlbeteiligung seit der Abschaffung der Wahlpflicht fortsetzt, macht zugleich sichtbar, wie groß die Verdrossenheit gegenüber Parteien und institutionalisierter Politik ist. Bis zum Inkrafttreten einer neuen Verfassung werden die Chileninnen und Chilenen noch zweimal um ihre Stimmabgabe gebeten: im April 2021 für die Wahl der Mitglieder der Verfassungsgebenden Versammlung sowie voraussichtlich Ende 2022 für die Entscheidung über den neuen Verfassungstext. Bei diesem so genannten Ausgangsreferendum wird im Unterschied zum Eingangsreferendum vom 25. Oktober die Wahlpflicht gelten. Sollte es zu einem Votum gegen den neuen Text kommen, bleibt die aktuelle Verfassung in Kraft.

Hohe Erwartungen an einen normativen Rahmen

Die Verfassungsgebende Versammlung wird sich unter anderem mit dem Verhältnis von Gesellschaft und Politik, von Wirtschaft und Staat sowie privatem und öffentlichem Sektor auseinandersetzen müssen. Auch die Anerkennung von Minderheiten und die Ausweitung von Rechten, etwa die Einführung von Sozialrechten oder des Rechts auf eine saubere Umwelt, werden Thema sein. Die Chance ist groß, dass daraus ein neuer Gesellschaftsvertrag mit großer Ursprungslegitimität hervorgeht – anders als beim geltenden Verfassungstext, der zwar mehrere demokratisierende Reformen erfahren hat, jedoch unter der Pinochet-Diktatur entstand. Doch eine neue Verfassung allein wird Chile nicht in den demokratischen und sozialen Rechtsstaat verwandeln können, nach dem sich so viele sehnen. Sie kann nur den normativen Rahmen schaffen, in dem pluralistischere und inklusivere Aushandlungsprozesse innovative Sozial- und Wirtschaftspolitiken hervorbringen können. Hierzu müssen die etablierten Eliten aber bereit sein, ihre Privilegien aufzugeben, Kompromisse zu machen, Konflikte auszuhalten und sich mutig auf ergebnisoffeneren politische Verfahren einzulassen. Mit Blick auf andere Beispiele aus der Andenregion hat der chilenische Kongress vorsorglich gesetzgeberisch die Gefahr ausgeräumt, dass die Verfassungsgebende Versammlung durch Selbstermächtigung eine umfassende Volkssouveränität für sich beansprucht oder der verfassungsgebende Prozess thematisch wie zeitlich aus den Fugen gerät. Auch ist festgelegt worden, dass Chile eine Republik bleibt sowie ratifizierte internationale Verträge und rechtskräftige Urteile Geltung behalten.

Große Herausforderungen im Prozess

Um zu verhindern, dass der Verfassungsprozess das Land lange lahmlegt, hat der Kongress einen sehr straffen Arbeitsplan aufgestellt: Die Verfassungsgebende Versammlung wird neun bzw. maximal zwölf Monate lang tagen dürfen. Da der neue Verfassungstext »auf dem weißen Blatt« – also ohne vorausgehende Verfassungsentwürfe oder konkrete, umfassende Verfassungsprojekte als Grundlage – entsteht, ist der Zeitdruck allerdings immens. Dies einmal mehr, als für die Annahme der Beschlüsse stets eine aufwendig zu beschaffende Zweidrittelmehrheit erforderlich ist.

Bis Chile eine neue Verfassung hat, werden nichtsdestotrotz noch gut zwei Jahre vergehen, da die Verfassungsgebende Versammlung ihre Arbeit laut Plan erst im Mai 2021 aufnimmt. So lange muss Chile aber weiterregiert werden. Präsident Sebastián Piñera, dessen Regierungskoalition in der Verfassungsfrage gespalten war, bemühte sich zuletzt um eine positive Leseart des Plebiszits im Sinne einer Stärkung der chilenischen Demokratie und versprach bedeutende politische Reformen unabhängig vom Verfassungsprojekt. Dennoch wird es eine große Herausforderung für seine Regierung sein, Erwartungsmanagement entlang des Verfassungsprozesses zu betreiben und Chile durch die Präsidentschafts- und Parlamentswahlen im November 2021 zu führen – während die Verfassungsgebende Versammlung noch tagt. Ein erneuter Ausbruch von Gewalt sollte unbedingt vermieden werden.

Der Verfassungsgebenden Versammlung wird ihrerseits die gewaltige Aufgabe zukommen, für die Inklusion zu sorgen, die die meisten Bürgerinnen und Bürger Chiles in zahlreichen Bereichen vermissen. Während dank des ausordentlichen Engagements der Frauenbewegung die Genderparität für die Verfassungsgebende Versammlung bereits festgeschrieben ist, wird im Kongress noch über die Beteiligung von Indigenen und unabhängigen Kandidatinnen und Kandidaten diskutiert. Neben der physischen Vertretung verschiedener Gesellschaftsgruppen (deskriptive Repräsentation) ist aber auch deren inhaltlicher Einfluss (substantive Repräsentation) im Gremium für eine gelingende Beteiligung unabdingbar. Hierfür ist es notwendig, dass die Verfassungsgebende Versammlung Mechanismen zur Kommunikation mit der Zivilgesellschaft etabliert; im Zuge der Proteste sind im letzten Jahr zahlreiche Dialogforen entstanden, die einen Beitrag zum Verfassungsprozess leisten möchten.

Eine Parteienstunde der anderen Art

Viele der Vorzüge, die der chilenischen Demokratie in den letzten Dekaden aus guten Gründen zugeschrieben wurden, sind einem stark strukturierten Parteiensystem mit hoch institutionalisierten und an Konsens orientierten politischen Parteien zu verdanken. Dieses Modell begann zu versagen, als die Stabilität zur Starre wurde und sich die politischen und ökonomischen Eliten, unter anderem aufgrund von Oligarchisierungstendenzen und Korruption, zunehmend von der breiten Gesellschaft abkoppelten. Diese verlor die Geduld und äußerte ihren Unmut im letzten Jahr massiv auf den Straßen. Auch im verfassungsgebenden Prozess werden die politischen Parteien ausschlaggebend sein. Es ist zu hoffen, dass sie die dringende Notwendigkeit erkennen, sich neuen Akteuren, Anliegen und Anschauungen zu öffnen, damit sie zentrale Instanzen auch des künftigen politischen Systems Chiles bleiben können.

Sustainable finance: International standards are important

 Paris Climate Agreement. Standards for when a financial product can be considered sustainable must be clearly defined and internationally agreed.
Standards and criteria are needed to determine when a financial instrument is sound and sustainable. Such standards improve transparency and strengthen investors’ trust. The criteria enable investors to differentiate between “green” and “non-green” activities and distinguish related financial instruments.
In addition, financial institutions themselves need standards for “green” financial instruments for purposes of internal budgeting, accounting, performance measurement and environmental risk management. Of course, standards also enable policy makers to design tax breaks and subsidies in ways to ensure that financial instruments truly support sustainable development. On the other hand, if the criteria defining “green” financial instruments are too strict, they can impede development of products such as green bonds. In order to reap the full benefits of standards, different standards should be coordinated at an international level. It does not make sense for each country using its own definition of what a “green bond” is.
The European Union has addressed these problems. In 2018, the European Commission (EC) drew up an Action Plan for financing sustainable growth, including a strategy for a sustainable financial system (EC 2018).

Sustainable finance: International standards are important

 Paris Climate Agreement. Standards for when a financial product can be considered sustainable must be clearly defined and internationally agreed.
Standards and criteria are needed to determine when a financial instrument is sound and sustainable. Such standards improve transparency and strengthen investors’ trust. The criteria enable investors to differentiate between “green” and “non-green” activities and distinguish related financial instruments.
In addition, financial institutions themselves need standards for “green” financial instruments for purposes of internal budgeting, accounting, performance measurement and environmental risk management. Of course, standards also enable policy makers to design tax breaks and subsidies in ways to ensure that financial instruments truly support sustainable development. On the other hand, if the criteria defining “green” financial instruments are too strict, they can impede development of products such as green bonds. In order to reap the full benefits of standards, different standards should be coordinated at an international level. It does not make sense for each country using its own definition of what a “green bond” is.
The European Union has addressed these problems. In 2018, the European Commission (EC) drew up an Action Plan for financing sustainable growth, including a strategy for a sustainable financial system (EC 2018).

Sustainable finance: International standards are important

 Paris Climate Agreement. Standards for when a financial product can be considered sustainable must be clearly defined and internationally agreed.
Standards and criteria are needed to determine when a financial instrument is sound and sustainable. Such standards improve transparency and strengthen investors’ trust. The criteria enable investors to differentiate between “green” and “non-green” activities and distinguish related financial instruments.
In addition, financial institutions themselves need standards for “green” financial instruments for purposes of internal budgeting, accounting, performance measurement and environmental risk management. Of course, standards also enable policy makers to design tax breaks and subsidies in ways to ensure that financial instruments truly support sustainable development. On the other hand, if the criteria defining “green” financial instruments are too strict, they can impede development of products such as green bonds. In order to reap the full benefits of standards, different standards should be coordinated at an international level. It does not make sense for each country using its own definition of what a “green bond” is.
The European Union has addressed these problems. In 2018, the European Commission (EC) drew up an Action Plan for financing sustainable growth, including a strategy for a sustainable financial system (EC 2018).

Mixed and multi-methods to evaluate implementation processes and early effects of the Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana Scheme in seven Indian states

In September 2018, India launched Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana (PM-JAY), a nationally implemented government-funded health insurance scheme to improve access to quality inpatient care, increase financial protection, and reduce unmet need for the most vulnerable population groups. This paper describes the methodology adopted to evaluate implementation processes and early effects of PM-JAY in seven Indian states. The study adopts a mixed and multi-methods concurrent triangulation design including three components: 1. demand-side household study, including a structured survey and qualitative elements, to quantify and understand PM-JAY reach and its effect on insurance awareness, health service utilization, and financial protection; 2. supply-side hospital-based survey encompassing both quantitative and qualitative elements to assess the effect of PM-JAY on quality of service delivery and to explore healthcare providers’ experiences with scheme implementation; and 3. process documentation to examine implementation processes in selected states transitioning from either no or prior health insurance to PM-JAY. Descriptive statistics and quasi-experimental methods will be used to analyze quantitative data, while thematic analysis will be used to analyze qualitative data. The study design presented represents the first effort to jointly evaluate implementation processes and early effects of the largest government-funded health insurance scheme ever launched in India.

Mixed and multi-methods to evaluate implementation processes and early effects of the Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana Scheme in seven Indian states

In September 2018, India launched Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana (PM-JAY), a nationally implemented government-funded health insurance scheme to improve access to quality inpatient care, increase financial protection, and reduce unmet need for the most vulnerable population groups. This paper describes the methodology adopted to evaluate implementation processes and early effects of PM-JAY in seven Indian states. The study adopts a mixed and multi-methods concurrent triangulation design including three components: 1. demand-side household study, including a structured survey and qualitative elements, to quantify and understand PM-JAY reach and its effect on insurance awareness, health service utilization, and financial protection; 2. supply-side hospital-based survey encompassing both quantitative and qualitative elements to assess the effect of PM-JAY on quality of service delivery and to explore healthcare providers’ experiences with scheme implementation; and 3. process documentation to examine implementation processes in selected states transitioning from either no or prior health insurance to PM-JAY. Descriptive statistics and quasi-experimental methods will be used to analyze quantitative data, while thematic analysis will be used to analyze qualitative data. The study design presented represents the first effort to jointly evaluate implementation processes and early effects of the largest government-funded health insurance scheme ever launched in India.

Mixed and multi-methods to evaluate implementation processes and early effects of the Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana Scheme in seven Indian states

In September 2018, India launched Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana (PM-JAY), a nationally implemented government-funded health insurance scheme to improve access to quality inpatient care, increase financial protection, and reduce unmet need for the most vulnerable population groups. This paper describes the methodology adopted to evaluate implementation processes and early effects of PM-JAY in seven Indian states. The study adopts a mixed and multi-methods concurrent triangulation design including three components: 1. demand-side household study, including a structured survey and qualitative elements, to quantify and understand PM-JAY reach and its effect on insurance awareness, health service utilization, and financial protection; 2. supply-side hospital-based survey encompassing both quantitative and qualitative elements to assess the effect of PM-JAY on quality of service delivery and to explore healthcare providers’ experiences with scheme implementation; and 3. process documentation to examine implementation processes in selected states transitioning from either no or prior health insurance to PM-JAY. Descriptive statistics and quasi-experimental methods will be used to analyze quantitative data, while thematic analysis will be used to analyze qualitative data. The study design presented represents the first effort to jointly evaluate implementation processes and early effects of the largest government-funded health insurance scheme ever launched in India.

China Trends #7 - La "double circulation" de l’économie chinoise

Institut Montaigne - Tue, 27/10/2020 - 11:10

Le concept de double circulation (双循环), stratégie de politique économique visant à stimuler simultanément le marché intérieur (circulation intérieure) et le marché extérieur (circulation internationale), a depuis mai des échos importants en Chine et hors de ses frontières. Alors que certains observateurs occidentaux craignent que cette nouvelle stratégie n’indique l’intention de la Chine de s'isoler du reste du monde, au regard du poids de la substitution aux…

Social assistance and inclusive growth

The expansion of social assistance in low‐ and middle‐income countries raises important issues for inclusive growth. Labour is by far the principal asset of low‐income groups. Changes in the quantity, quality, and allocation of labour associated with social assistance will impact on the productive capacity of low‐income groups and therefore on inclusive growth. The article re‐assesses the findings reported by impact evaluations of social assistance in low‐ and middle‐income countries to address this issue. Most studies have tested for potentially adverse labour supply incentive effects from transfers but have failed to find supportive evidence. The article highlights findings from this literature on the effects of social assistance on human capital accumulation and labour reallocation. They point to the conclusion that well‐designed and well‐implemented social assistance contributes to inclusive growth.

Social assistance and inclusive growth

The expansion of social assistance in low‐ and middle‐income countries raises important issues for inclusive growth. Labour is by far the principal asset of low‐income groups. Changes in the quantity, quality, and allocation of labour associated with social assistance will impact on the productive capacity of low‐income groups and therefore on inclusive growth. The article re‐assesses the findings reported by impact evaluations of social assistance in low‐ and middle‐income countries to address this issue. Most studies have tested for potentially adverse labour supply incentive effects from transfers but have failed to find supportive evidence. The article highlights findings from this literature on the effects of social assistance on human capital accumulation and labour reallocation. They point to the conclusion that well‐designed and well‐implemented social assistance contributes to inclusive growth.

Pages