You are here

Diplomacy & Defense Think Tank News

How can the G20 support innovative: mechanisms to mobilise financial resources for LDCs in a post-pandemic world?

Innovative financing for development can contribute to closing the financial gap by mobilising new funds for sustainable development and leveraging existing scarce public concessional resources (ODA). In addition to domestic resources and traditional external financial resources, innovative financing mechanisms can mobilise further financial resources for LDCs. In view of the LDCs’ enormous sustainable investment needs, mobilising private financial resources is both crucial and inescapable. Blended finance represents an important instrument to combine ODA with private finance, thereby leveraging scarce concessional public financial resources. The G20 should consider promoting the adoption and implementation of the OECD Blended Finance Principles in LICs to enhance blended finance in these countries. As many LDCs do not have sufficient institutional capacity. To adopt blended finance instruments the G20 should support LDC in developing institutional capacity to effectively implement blended finance tools and to lower risks associated with blended finance. An additional instrument to enhance external financial resources to LDCs is to allocate the recently approved new SDR allocation to LDCs exceeding LDCs quota. The G20 should take on a leading by example/frontrunner role and donate as well as lend a percentage of their allocations, discuss establishing a special purpose fund (i.e. a green or health fund), support allocating a large amount of SDRs to LDCs exceeding their quota and discuss proposals how to allocate them among LICs and discuss how these financial instruments can be used to ensure a sustainable and inclusive recovery from the covid-19 crisis. As the fragmented architecture of sustainable bond standards represent one main challenge in mobilising financial resources for attaining the SDGs by issuing sustainable bonds the G20 should discuss and promote harmonisation of sustainable bond standards. Moreover, the G20 countries should provide capacity building for LDCs for developing the sustainable bond market in these countries.

How can the G20 support innovative: mechanisms to mobilise financial resources for LDCs in a post-pandemic world?

Innovative financing for development can contribute to closing the financial gap by mobilising new funds for sustainable development and leveraging existing scarce public concessional resources (ODA). In addition to domestic resources and traditional external financial resources, innovative financing mechanisms can mobilise further financial resources for LDCs. In view of the LDCs’ enormous sustainable investment needs, mobilising private financial resources is both crucial and inescapable. Blended finance represents an important instrument to combine ODA with private finance, thereby leveraging scarce concessional public financial resources. The G20 should consider promoting the adoption and implementation of the OECD Blended Finance Principles in LICs to enhance blended finance in these countries. As many LDCs do not have sufficient institutional capacity. To adopt blended finance instruments the G20 should support LDC in developing institutional capacity to effectively implement blended finance tools and to lower risks associated with blended finance. An additional instrument to enhance external financial resources to LDCs is to allocate the recently approved new SDR allocation to LDCs exceeding LDCs quota. The G20 should take on a leading by example/frontrunner role and donate as well as lend a percentage of their allocations, discuss establishing a special purpose fund (i.e. a green or health fund), support allocating a large amount of SDRs to LDCs exceeding their quota and discuss proposals how to allocate them among LICs and discuss how these financial instruments can be used to ensure a sustainable and inclusive recovery from the covid-19 crisis. As the fragmented architecture of sustainable bond standards represent one main challenge in mobilising financial resources for attaining the SDGs by issuing sustainable bonds the G20 should discuss and promote harmonisation of sustainable bond standards. Moreover, the G20 countries should provide capacity building for LDCs for developing the sustainable bond market in these countries.

How can the G20 support innovative: mechanisms to mobilise financial resources for LDCs in a post-pandemic world?

Innovative financing for development can contribute to closing the financial gap by mobilising new funds for sustainable development and leveraging existing scarce public concessional resources (ODA). In addition to domestic resources and traditional external financial resources, innovative financing mechanisms can mobilise further financial resources for LDCs. In view of the LDCs’ enormous sustainable investment needs, mobilising private financial resources is both crucial and inescapable. Blended finance represents an important instrument to combine ODA with private finance, thereby leveraging scarce concessional public financial resources. The G20 should consider promoting the adoption and implementation of the OECD Blended Finance Principles in LICs to enhance blended finance in these countries. As many LDCs do not have sufficient institutional capacity. To adopt blended finance instruments the G20 should support LDC in developing institutional capacity to effectively implement blended finance tools and to lower risks associated with blended finance. An additional instrument to enhance external financial resources to LDCs is to allocate the recently approved new SDR allocation to LDCs exceeding LDCs quota. The G20 should take on a leading by example/frontrunner role and donate as well as lend a percentage of their allocations, discuss establishing a special purpose fund (i.e. a green or health fund), support allocating a large amount of SDRs to LDCs exceeding their quota and discuss proposals how to allocate them among LICs and discuss how these financial instruments can be used to ensure a sustainable and inclusive recovery from the covid-19 crisis. As the fragmented architecture of sustainable bond standards represent one main challenge in mobilising financial resources for attaining the SDGs by issuing sustainable bonds the G20 should discuss and promote harmonisation of sustainable bond standards. Moreover, the G20 countries should provide capacity building for LDCs for developing the sustainable bond market in these countries.

Fixing UN financing: a pandora’s box the World Health Organization should open

It is no secret that the World Health Organization (WHO) is grossly underfunded. As its Executive Board meets this week to discuss how it can become the global health institution the world needs and wants, all eyes will be on whether the WHO can finally solve the problem of its precarious financing. But there is even more at stake in this debate than the WHO’s own financial health. If a financial fix can be found for what ails the WHO, there will likely be ripple effects for the ways member states fund entities across the United Nations system whose funding structures are equally shaky. It is the possibility of these downstream consequences – including the potential liabilities that action at the WHO could place on reform efforts in other UN entities – that is one of the greatest political challenges to fixing the WHO’s balance sheet. Nevertheless, this is a Pandora’s box worth opening. The lack of predictable and flexible finance for a sickly UN multilateral system is a problem in urgent need of a solution.

Fixing UN financing: a pandora’s box the World Health Organization should open

It is no secret that the World Health Organization (WHO) is grossly underfunded. As its Executive Board meets this week to discuss how it can become the global health institution the world needs and wants, all eyes will be on whether the WHO can finally solve the problem of its precarious financing. But there is even more at stake in this debate than the WHO’s own financial health. If a financial fix can be found for what ails the WHO, there will likely be ripple effects for the ways member states fund entities across the United Nations system whose funding structures are equally shaky. It is the possibility of these downstream consequences – including the potential liabilities that action at the WHO could place on reform efforts in other UN entities – that is one of the greatest political challenges to fixing the WHO’s balance sheet. Nevertheless, this is a Pandora’s box worth opening. The lack of predictable and flexible finance for a sickly UN multilateral system is a problem in urgent need of a solution.

Fixing UN financing: a pandora’s box the World Health Organization should open

It is no secret that the World Health Organization (WHO) is grossly underfunded. As its Executive Board meets this week to discuss how it can become the global health institution the world needs and wants, all eyes will be on whether the WHO can finally solve the problem of its precarious financing. But there is even more at stake in this debate than the WHO’s own financial health. If a financial fix can be found for what ails the WHO, there will likely be ripple effects for the ways member states fund entities across the United Nations system whose funding structures are equally shaky. It is the possibility of these downstream consequences – including the potential liabilities that action at the WHO could place on reform efforts in other UN entities – that is one of the greatest political challenges to fixing the WHO’s balance sheet. Nevertheless, this is a Pandora’s box worth opening. The lack of predictable and flexible finance for a sickly UN multilateral system is a problem in urgent need of a solution.

Claudia Kemfert: „Die Gasversorgung ist in diesem Winter gesichert, aber Deutschland hat viele Fehler gemacht“

Die Zuspitzung der Ukraine-Krise könnte auch Auswirkungen auf die russischen Gaslieferungen an Deutschland haben. Ob es dadurch zu Energie-Engpässen kommen könnte und welche Auswirkungen es auf die Gaspreise hätte, kommentiert Claudia Kemfert, Leiterin der Abteilung Energie, Verkehr, Umwelt am Deutschen Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (DIW Berlin):

Wenn sich der Ukraine-Konflikt weiter verschärft und es tatsächlich zu einem Lieferstopp durch Russland nach Deutschland kommt, wären wir inmitten der nächsten Gaskrise. Deutschland bezieht derzeit knapp 50 Prozent seines Gases aus Russland. Wenn Russland gar nichts mehr liefert, wird es eng. Infolgedessen würden die Gaspreise weiter steigen – und damit auch die Kosten für Verbraucherinnen und Verbraucher sowie die Wirtschaft insgesamt.

Insbesondere die Heizkosten würden zulegen. Im Stromsektor käme mehr Kohle zum Einsatz, was die Emissionen ansteigen ließe. Dadurch stiege wiederum der Strompreis. Alleiniger Grund für die hohen Energiekosten sind die Preisschocks ausgelöst durch die fossile Energiekrise und fossilen Energiekriege. Nicht die Energiewende treibt die Energiekosten, sondern die Verschleppung der Energiewende. Dadurch leiden vor allem Bezieherinnen und Bezieher von Niedrigeinkommen. Diese sollten entlastet werden durch eine Pro-Kopf-Rückzahlung der CO2-Einnahmen im Rahmen einer Klimaprämie.

Die derzeitige Lage verdeutlicht, dass wir endlich eine strategische Gasreserve benötigen, für die wir bereits seit über zehn Jahren werben. Zudem war es falsch, einen Teil der wichtigen Gasspeicher in Deutschland einem russischen Gaskonzern zu verkaufen, ohne eine entsprechende Regulierung für den Ernstfall einzuführen. Deutschland hat es vor über 15 Jahren versäumt, einen eigenen Flüssiggasterminal zu bauen, um Flüssiggas aus anderen Quellen als aus Russland zu importieren. Andere europäische Länder haben viel stärker auf eine Diversifikation der Gasbezüge gesetzt. Die Gasspeicher sind derzeit weniger als halbvoll. Dennoch gibt es zusammen mit Gasspeichern aus anderen europäischen Ländern ausreichend Gas, um Deutschland, aber auch ganz Europa mit Gas über den Winter zu versorgen.

Urban governance in conflict zones: contentious politics, not resilience

This chapter builds on extant criticism of contemporary applications of 'resilience' to societal challenges. Its objectives are, first, to explain the concept's salience in policymaking on human security in cities; second, to explore its ontological limitations; and finally, to encourage an embrace of contentious urban politics. The chapter's position is cautiously optimistic about the potential of collective action by city dwellers seeking to reduce chronic and acute violence. However, such practices are inherently political - a dimension eclipsed by dominant conceptualizations of resilience in the context of urban violence. The chapter illustrates collective acts of local resistance - not resilience - with examples from Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, during a particularly violent phase of the city's troubled recent past. It concludes that pontificating about resilience as desirable and attainable for cities in conflict misses the mark, and shifts both attention and resources away from actions to safeguard local approaches that can be effective.

Urban governance in conflict zones: contentious politics, not resilience

This chapter builds on extant criticism of contemporary applications of 'resilience' to societal challenges. Its objectives are, first, to explain the concept's salience in policymaking on human security in cities; second, to explore its ontological limitations; and finally, to encourage an embrace of contentious urban politics. The chapter's position is cautiously optimistic about the potential of collective action by city dwellers seeking to reduce chronic and acute violence. However, such practices are inherently political - a dimension eclipsed by dominant conceptualizations of resilience in the context of urban violence. The chapter illustrates collective acts of local resistance - not resilience - with examples from Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, during a particularly violent phase of the city's troubled recent past. It concludes that pontificating about resilience as desirable and attainable for cities in conflict misses the mark, and shifts both attention and resources away from actions to safeguard local approaches that can be effective.

Urban governance in conflict zones: contentious politics, not resilience

This chapter builds on extant criticism of contemporary applications of 'resilience' to societal challenges. Its objectives are, first, to explain the concept's salience in policymaking on human security in cities; second, to explore its ontological limitations; and finally, to encourage an embrace of contentious urban politics. The chapter's position is cautiously optimistic about the potential of collective action by city dwellers seeking to reduce chronic and acute violence. However, such practices are inherently political - a dimension eclipsed by dominant conceptualizations of resilience in the context of urban violence. The chapter illustrates collective acts of local resistance - not resilience - with examples from Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, during a particularly violent phase of the city's troubled recent past. It concludes that pontificating about resilience as desirable and attainable for cities in conflict misses the mark, and shifts both attention and resources away from actions to safeguard local approaches that can be effective.

Hohe Preise für Kupfer, Lithium, Nickel und Kobalt könnten Energiewende ausbremsen

Zusammenfassung:

Studie auf Basis von SOEP-Daten – Generation der 68er bleibt häufiger auch nach dem Renteneintritt ehrenamtlich aktiv – Anstieg des Engagements geht aber auch auf junge Menschen zurück – Pflicht zum Engagement für bestimmte Altersgruppen wäre nicht zielführend, stattdessen sollten flexible und niedrigschwellige Angebote für alle geschaffen werden, die ehrenamtlich aktiv sein wollen

Fast jede dritte in Deutschland lebende Person ab 17 Jahren – insgesamt also rund 22 Millionen – engagiert sich ehrenamtlich. Der Anteil der ehrenamtlich Aktiven lag im Jahr 2017 bei rund 32 Prozent und damit um fünf Prozentpunkte höher als im Jahr 1990. Sowohl junge Erwachsene als auch Rentnerinnen und Rentner sind zunehmend bereit, beispielsweise in Vereinen, Initiativen oder der Flüchtlingshilfe freiwillig mit anzupacken. Das sind zentrale Ergebnisse einer Studie des Deutschen Instituts für Wirtschaftsforschung (DIW Berlin), die auf repräsentativen Daten des Sozio-oekonomischen Panels (SOEP) basiert.


Finanzierung der Transformation zur Nachhaltigkeit: Eine Herkulesaufgabe für die EU?

Zur Erreichung der Nachhaltigkeitsziele und zur Bewältigung der COVID-19-Pandemie besteht ein hoher Finanzbedarf. Dafür hat die Europäische Kommission zum einen 2018 den „Aktionsplan zur Finanzierung von nachhaltigem Wachstum“ und zum anderen 2021 darauf aufbauend die „Strategie zur Finanzierung einer nachhaltigen Wirtschaft“ ins Leben gerufen.
Insgesamt hat die EU ein umfangreiches Paket für die Ausgestaltung eines nachhaltigen Finanzsystems geschnürt und eine weltweit bislang einmalige Strategie angestoßen. Insofern übernimmt die EU in vielen Sustainable Finance-Bereichen weltweit eine Vorreiterrolle und exportiert ihre Ansätze auch in anderen Regionen und Länder der Welt. Damit attrahiert die EU internationale Investoren mit einem Fokus auf Nachhaltigkeit für den europäischen Finanzmarkt. Besonders in der zweiten Phase werden die wichtigsten Akteure des europäischen Finanzsystems in die Umsetzung und Verwirklichung der Nachhaltigkeitsziele eingebunden. Es ist auch zu berücksichtigen, dass es unmöglich ist eine derartige Herkulesaufgabe - ein an die Nachhaltigkeit ausgerichtetes Finanzsystem in einem Guss - zu planen und umzusetzen. Vermutlich wird es viele Jahre eventuell sogar zwei bis drei Jahrzehnte dauern, bis eine derartige Transformation vollständig ist.
Vor dem Hintergrund, dass die EU ein nachhaltiges Finanzsystem nicht zu einem Zeitpunkt aufbauen konnte, ist es wichtig, die richtige Abfolge der Maßnahmen (Sequencing) zu wählen. Daher stellt sich die Frage, ob die Schwerpunkte des „Aktionsplan zur Finanzierung von nachhaltigem Wachstum“ von 2018 auf Taxonomien, Standards, Normen, Referenzwerte und Offenlegungspflichten geeignet waren, um ein nachhaltiges Finanzsystem in Europa zu starten. Besonders zwei Schwerpunkte der „Strategie zur Finanzierung einer nachhaltigen Wirtschaft“ von 2021, die Erhöhung der Widerstandsfähigkeit und des Beitrags des Finanzsektors sowie die Unterstützung einer internationalen Strategie für ein nachhaltiges Finanzsystem, wären bereits in der ersten Phase wichtig gewesen. In diesem Zusammenhang ist auch zu kritisieren, dass die nachhaltige Transformation des realen Sektors schon viel früher begonnen hat als die Einführung eines nachhaltigen Finanzsystems.
Zudem gibt es noch einige Lücken in der laufenden Strategie ein nachhaltiges europäisches Finanzsystem zu errichten. Bisher fokussiert die Nachhaltigkeitsstrategie bis auf wenige Ausnahmen auf die Klima- und Umweltziele. Es sollten aber nicht nur die Klima- und Umweltziele sondern alle ESG-Ziele in einer derartigen Strategie angegangen werden. Soziale Faktoren werden bisher nur wenig berücksichtigt. Die EU arbeitet zwar auch an einer Taxonomie für soziale Finanzierung , aber soziale Faktoren werden bei den meisten Maßnahmen der EU-Strategie noch nicht oder kaum berücksichtigt, auch wenn dieses in der Planung ist.
Die internationale Plattform für nachhaltige Finanzierung entwickelt zwar derzeit eine international „einheitlichen Basistaxonomie“, aber diese Plattform könnte auch für die Entwicklung anderer Basisinstrumente genutzt werden, wie zum Beispiel die Entwicklung von international einheitlichen Basisrechnungslegungsstandards in Zusammenarbeit mit dem International Accounting Standards Board. Auf der COP26 wurde im November 2021 angekündigt, dass die International Sustainability Standards Board (ISSB) weltweit gültige Offenlegungsstandards erarbeiten soll. Infolge der Verflechtung der internationalen Finanzmärkte sind internationale Mindeststandards in vielen Bereichen des nachhaltigen Finanzsystems nicht zuletzt für die Verhinderung von regulatorischer Arbitrage und die Stabilität der internationalen Finanzmärkte wichtig.
Die EU hat aber ein weltweit bisher einmalige Maßnahmen für den Aufbau eines nachhaltigen Finanzsystems eingeleitet und damit besonders einen wichtigen Beitrag zur Erreichung der der Klima- und Umweltziele gemacht.

Finanzierung der Transformation zur Nachhaltigkeit: Eine Herkulesaufgabe für die EU?

Zur Erreichung der Nachhaltigkeitsziele und zur Bewältigung der COVID-19-Pandemie besteht ein hoher Finanzbedarf. Dafür hat die Europäische Kommission zum einen 2018 den „Aktionsplan zur Finanzierung von nachhaltigem Wachstum“ und zum anderen 2021 darauf aufbauend die „Strategie zur Finanzierung einer nachhaltigen Wirtschaft“ ins Leben gerufen.
Insgesamt hat die EU ein umfangreiches Paket für die Ausgestaltung eines nachhaltigen Finanzsystems geschnürt und eine weltweit bislang einmalige Strategie angestoßen. Insofern übernimmt die EU in vielen Sustainable Finance-Bereichen weltweit eine Vorreiterrolle und exportiert ihre Ansätze auch in anderen Regionen und Länder der Welt. Damit attrahiert die EU internationale Investoren mit einem Fokus auf Nachhaltigkeit für den europäischen Finanzmarkt. Besonders in der zweiten Phase werden die wichtigsten Akteure des europäischen Finanzsystems in die Umsetzung und Verwirklichung der Nachhaltigkeitsziele eingebunden. Es ist auch zu berücksichtigen, dass es unmöglich ist eine derartige Herkulesaufgabe - ein an die Nachhaltigkeit ausgerichtetes Finanzsystem in einem Guss - zu planen und umzusetzen. Vermutlich wird es viele Jahre eventuell sogar zwei bis drei Jahrzehnte dauern, bis eine derartige Transformation vollständig ist.
Vor dem Hintergrund, dass die EU ein nachhaltiges Finanzsystem nicht zu einem Zeitpunkt aufbauen konnte, ist es wichtig, die richtige Abfolge der Maßnahmen (Sequencing) zu wählen. Daher stellt sich die Frage, ob die Schwerpunkte des „Aktionsplan zur Finanzierung von nachhaltigem Wachstum“ von 2018 auf Taxonomien, Standards, Normen, Referenzwerte und Offenlegungspflichten geeignet waren, um ein nachhaltiges Finanzsystem in Europa zu starten. Besonders zwei Schwerpunkte der „Strategie zur Finanzierung einer nachhaltigen Wirtschaft“ von 2021, die Erhöhung der Widerstandsfähigkeit und des Beitrags des Finanzsektors sowie die Unterstützung einer internationalen Strategie für ein nachhaltiges Finanzsystem, wären bereits in der ersten Phase wichtig gewesen. In diesem Zusammenhang ist auch zu kritisieren, dass die nachhaltige Transformation des realen Sektors schon viel früher begonnen hat als die Einführung eines nachhaltigen Finanzsystems.
Zudem gibt es noch einige Lücken in der laufenden Strategie ein nachhaltiges europäisches Finanzsystem zu errichten. Bisher fokussiert die Nachhaltigkeitsstrategie bis auf wenige Ausnahmen auf die Klima- und Umweltziele. Es sollten aber nicht nur die Klima- und Umweltziele sondern alle ESG-Ziele in einer derartigen Strategie angegangen werden. Soziale Faktoren werden bisher nur wenig berücksichtigt. Die EU arbeitet zwar auch an einer Taxonomie für soziale Finanzierung , aber soziale Faktoren werden bei den meisten Maßnahmen der EU-Strategie noch nicht oder kaum berücksichtigt, auch wenn dieses in der Planung ist.
Die internationale Plattform für nachhaltige Finanzierung entwickelt zwar derzeit eine international „einheitlichen Basistaxonomie“, aber diese Plattform könnte auch für die Entwicklung anderer Basisinstrumente genutzt werden, wie zum Beispiel die Entwicklung von international einheitlichen Basisrechnungslegungsstandards in Zusammenarbeit mit dem International Accounting Standards Board. Auf der COP26 wurde im November 2021 angekündigt, dass die International Sustainability Standards Board (ISSB) weltweit gültige Offenlegungsstandards erarbeiten soll. Infolge der Verflechtung der internationalen Finanzmärkte sind internationale Mindeststandards in vielen Bereichen des nachhaltigen Finanzsystems nicht zuletzt für die Verhinderung von regulatorischer Arbitrage und die Stabilität der internationalen Finanzmärkte wichtig.
Die EU hat aber ein weltweit bisher einmalige Maßnahmen für den Aufbau eines nachhaltigen Finanzsystems eingeleitet und damit besonders einen wichtigen Beitrag zur Erreichung der der Klima- und Umweltziele gemacht.

Finanzierung der Transformation zur Nachhaltigkeit: Eine Herkulesaufgabe für die EU?

Zur Erreichung der Nachhaltigkeitsziele und zur Bewältigung der COVID-19-Pandemie besteht ein hoher Finanzbedarf. Dafür hat die Europäische Kommission zum einen 2018 den „Aktionsplan zur Finanzierung von nachhaltigem Wachstum“ und zum anderen 2021 darauf aufbauend die „Strategie zur Finanzierung einer nachhaltigen Wirtschaft“ ins Leben gerufen.
Insgesamt hat die EU ein umfangreiches Paket für die Ausgestaltung eines nachhaltigen Finanzsystems geschnürt und eine weltweit bislang einmalige Strategie angestoßen. Insofern übernimmt die EU in vielen Sustainable Finance-Bereichen weltweit eine Vorreiterrolle und exportiert ihre Ansätze auch in anderen Regionen und Länder der Welt. Damit attrahiert die EU internationale Investoren mit einem Fokus auf Nachhaltigkeit für den europäischen Finanzmarkt. Besonders in der zweiten Phase werden die wichtigsten Akteure des europäischen Finanzsystems in die Umsetzung und Verwirklichung der Nachhaltigkeitsziele eingebunden. Es ist auch zu berücksichtigen, dass es unmöglich ist eine derartige Herkulesaufgabe - ein an die Nachhaltigkeit ausgerichtetes Finanzsystem in einem Guss - zu planen und umzusetzen. Vermutlich wird es viele Jahre eventuell sogar zwei bis drei Jahrzehnte dauern, bis eine derartige Transformation vollständig ist.
Vor dem Hintergrund, dass die EU ein nachhaltiges Finanzsystem nicht zu einem Zeitpunkt aufbauen konnte, ist es wichtig, die richtige Abfolge der Maßnahmen (Sequencing) zu wählen. Daher stellt sich die Frage, ob die Schwerpunkte des „Aktionsplan zur Finanzierung von nachhaltigem Wachstum“ von 2018 auf Taxonomien, Standards, Normen, Referenzwerte und Offenlegungspflichten geeignet waren, um ein nachhaltiges Finanzsystem in Europa zu starten. Besonders zwei Schwerpunkte der „Strategie zur Finanzierung einer nachhaltigen Wirtschaft“ von 2021, die Erhöhung der Widerstandsfähigkeit und des Beitrags des Finanzsektors sowie die Unterstützung einer internationalen Strategie für ein nachhaltiges Finanzsystem, wären bereits in der ersten Phase wichtig gewesen. In diesem Zusammenhang ist auch zu kritisieren, dass die nachhaltige Transformation des realen Sektors schon viel früher begonnen hat als die Einführung eines nachhaltigen Finanzsystems.
Zudem gibt es noch einige Lücken in der laufenden Strategie ein nachhaltiges europäisches Finanzsystem zu errichten. Bisher fokussiert die Nachhaltigkeitsstrategie bis auf wenige Ausnahmen auf die Klima- und Umweltziele. Es sollten aber nicht nur die Klima- und Umweltziele sondern alle ESG-Ziele in einer derartigen Strategie angegangen werden. Soziale Faktoren werden bisher nur wenig berücksichtigt. Die EU arbeitet zwar auch an einer Taxonomie für soziale Finanzierung , aber soziale Faktoren werden bei den meisten Maßnahmen der EU-Strategie noch nicht oder kaum berücksichtigt, auch wenn dieses in der Planung ist.
Die internationale Plattform für nachhaltige Finanzierung entwickelt zwar derzeit eine international „einheitlichen Basistaxonomie“, aber diese Plattform könnte auch für die Entwicklung anderer Basisinstrumente genutzt werden, wie zum Beispiel die Entwicklung von international einheitlichen Basisrechnungslegungsstandards in Zusammenarbeit mit dem International Accounting Standards Board. Auf der COP26 wurde im November 2021 angekündigt, dass die International Sustainability Standards Board (ISSB) weltweit gültige Offenlegungsstandards erarbeiten soll. Infolge der Verflechtung der internationalen Finanzmärkte sind internationale Mindeststandards in vielen Bereichen des nachhaltigen Finanzsystems nicht zuletzt für die Verhinderung von regulatorischer Arbitrage und die Stabilität der internationalen Finanzmärkte wichtig.
Die EU hat aber ein weltweit bisher einmalige Maßnahmen für den Aufbau eines nachhaltigen Finanzsystems eingeleitet und damit besonders einen wichtigen Beitrag zur Erreichung der der Klima- und Umweltziele gemacht.

Ride-sharing apps for urban refugees: easing or exacerbating a digital transport disadvantage?

For many urban refugees, the legal grey areas that often define their status in host countries mean living with varying levels of exclusion from urban resources. One of the key resources that urban refugees in developing countries acutely need, but are often either excluded from or priced out of, is transportation. This paper uses the concept of transportation disadvantage to understand how urban refugees in Kuala Lumpur lack sufficient transport options, and whether smartphone-based ride-sharing apps can improve refugees’ access to timely, fairly priced transportation. Almost all administrative activities that refugees engage in involve visiting an office, often for indeterminate amounts of time, far from where they live. Thus, flexible transportation is central to their daily lives. An innovation in urban transportation that could alleviate refugees’ transportation disadvantage are ride-sharing apps, which allow people with mobile phones to ‘hail’ drivers from their phone, set pick-up and drop-off locations, and have the price of the trip set in advance. While these apps, such as Uber, Grab, and Lyft, have introduced problems of congestion to cities, they also have the potential to serve an inclusive role for groups like urban refugees, who due to their legal status often face price discrimination from taxi drivers and do not live in areas with ready access to affordable public transportation. Drawing on fieldwork in Kuala Lumpur, this article evaluates the potential of ride sharing for making refugees’ daily lives easier while highlighting the policies that exclude them from using the ride-sharing app Grab. Based on that, I argue that technological innovation in transportation provision cannot improve urban refugees’ lives without corresponding policies that encourage greater social and political inclusion.

Ride-sharing apps for urban refugees: easing or exacerbating a digital transport disadvantage?

For many urban refugees, the legal grey areas that often define their status in host countries mean living with varying levels of exclusion from urban resources. One of the key resources that urban refugees in developing countries acutely need, but are often either excluded from or priced out of, is transportation. This paper uses the concept of transportation disadvantage to understand how urban refugees in Kuala Lumpur lack sufficient transport options, and whether smartphone-based ride-sharing apps can improve refugees’ access to timely, fairly priced transportation. Almost all administrative activities that refugees engage in involve visiting an office, often for indeterminate amounts of time, far from where they live. Thus, flexible transportation is central to their daily lives. An innovation in urban transportation that could alleviate refugees’ transportation disadvantage are ride-sharing apps, which allow people with mobile phones to ‘hail’ drivers from their phone, set pick-up and drop-off locations, and have the price of the trip set in advance. While these apps, such as Uber, Grab, and Lyft, have introduced problems of congestion to cities, they also have the potential to serve an inclusive role for groups like urban refugees, who due to their legal status often face price discrimination from taxi drivers and do not live in areas with ready access to affordable public transportation. Drawing on fieldwork in Kuala Lumpur, this article evaluates the potential of ride sharing for making refugees’ daily lives easier while highlighting the policies that exclude them from using the ride-sharing app Grab. Based on that, I argue that technological innovation in transportation provision cannot improve urban refugees’ lives without corresponding policies that encourage greater social and political inclusion.

Ride-sharing apps for urban refugees: easing or exacerbating a digital transport disadvantage?

For many urban refugees, the legal grey areas that often define their status in host countries mean living with varying levels of exclusion from urban resources. One of the key resources that urban refugees in developing countries acutely need, but are often either excluded from or priced out of, is transportation. This paper uses the concept of transportation disadvantage to understand how urban refugees in Kuala Lumpur lack sufficient transport options, and whether smartphone-based ride-sharing apps can improve refugees’ access to timely, fairly priced transportation. Almost all administrative activities that refugees engage in involve visiting an office, often for indeterminate amounts of time, far from where they live. Thus, flexible transportation is central to their daily lives. An innovation in urban transportation that could alleviate refugees’ transportation disadvantage are ride-sharing apps, which allow people with mobile phones to ‘hail’ drivers from their phone, set pick-up and drop-off locations, and have the price of the trip set in advance. While these apps, such as Uber, Grab, and Lyft, have introduced problems of congestion to cities, they also have the potential to serve an inclusive role for groups like urban refugees, who due to their legal status often face price discrimination from taxi drivers and do not live in areas with ready access to affordable public transportation. Drawing on fieldwork in Kuala Lumpur, this article evaluates the potential of ride sharing for making refugees’ daily lives easier while highlighting the policies that exclude them from using the ride-sharing app Grab. Based on that, I argue that technological innovation in transportation provision cannot improve urban refugees’ lives without corresponding policies that encourage greater social and political inclusion.

Warum Regierungen in Vertrauen investieren müssen, um COVID-19 zu beenden

Impf-Skeptizismus ist während der COVID-19-Pandemie zu einem globalen Problem geworden. Obwohl bisher die ungleiche globale Verteilung von Impfstoffen die größte Herausforderung für den globalen Süden darstellt, kann sie allein nicht die niedrigen Impfraten in vielen Ländern erklären. Impfverweigerung gibt es seit Jahrhunderten. Die Akzeptanz von Impfungen ist entscheidend für die Gesundheit der Öffentlichkeit, den Schutz Einzelner und besonders gefährdeter Gruppen. 2019 stufte die Weltgesundheitsorganisation (WHO) Impf-Skeptizismus als eine der größten Bedrohungen für die globale Gesundheit ein. Eine geringe Akzeptanz von COVID-19-Impfstoffen gibt es im Nahen Osten, Afrika, Europa und Russland. In Afrika sind die Zahlen sehr unterschiedlich. Etwa ein Drittel der Bevölkerung in Frankreich, Deutschland und den USA lehnt die COVID-19-Impfung ab. Sobald der Impfstoff im globalen Süden ausreichend verfügbar ist, könnte die Impfverweigerung eine globale Herausforderung im Kampf gegen die Pandemie darstellen.

Mangelndes Vertrauen als Ursache

Ein wesentlicher Grund für Impf-Skeptizismus ist mangelndes Vertrauen in Regierungen. Vor allem im globalen Süden schwächt das Erbe der westlichen Ausbeutung und des medizinischen Missbrauchs während und nach der Kolonialzeit das Vertrauen in den COVID-19-Impfstoff. Darüber hinaus geht die Anti-Impf-Stimmung in verschiedenen Weltregionen und sozialen Gruppen stark mit einer Anti-Establishment- und populistischen Politik einher. Populist*innen in Westeuropa verbreiten Zweifel an der Impfung als Protest gegen die Regierung. Auch in Südafrika, den USA und Neuseeland gibt es Beispiele für ähnliche Taktiken. Frühere Studien ergaben einen signifikanten positiven Zusammenhang zwischen dem Anteil der Wähler*innen populistischer Parteien und der Überzeugung, dass Impfstoffe in westeuropäischen Ländern nicht wichtig sind. Die zugrundeliegende Dynamik scheint ein globales Phänomen zu sein: Misstrauen gegenüber Wissenschaft und dem Wissen von Expert*innen.

Vertrauen wiederherstellen als zentrale Maßnahme

Um die Impfraten zu verbessern und gesellschaftliche Spaltungen zu überwinden, ist Vertrauen in Regierungen essentiell. Vier Säulen können dazu beitragen, das Vertrauen der Öffentlichkeit in die Absichten und Motive von Regierungen zu stärken: Menschlichkeit, Transparenz, Kompetenz und Zuverlässigkeit. Wie können Regierungen dies erreichen?

Erstens, indem sie Menschlichkeit zeigen und sich ernsthaft um das Wohlergehen der Menschen kümmern. Jedem Menschen gebührt Wertschätzung und Respekt, unabhängig von seinem oder ihrem Hintergrund, Identität oder Überzeugungen. Empathie ist die Grundlage für einen echten Austausch. Regierungen sollten in der Impfkampagne nicht nur versuchen, durch Vorschriften zu überzeugen. Sie müssen mit denjenigen, die sich nicht impfen lassen wollen, in einen offenen und empathischen Dialog treten und versuchen, ihre Sorgen zu verstehen. In San Francisco hat sich z.B. die Latino Task Force erfolgreich für die Impfung eingesetzt, indem sie direkt mit den am stärksten betroffenen Gruppen in Kontakt getreten ist.

Die zweite Säule, um Vertrauen zu stärken, ist Transparenz. Beweggründe für politische Entscheidungen müssen offen kommuniziert werden. Regierungen müssen Informationen z.B. in geeigneten digitalen Kanälen teilen. In Neukaledonien bewegen lokale Regierungen die Menschen zum Impfen, indem sie zu ihnen nach Hause gehen. In Botswana erhöht die Regierung die Impfquote durch die Social-Media-Kampagne #ArmReady.

Drittens müssen Regierungen ihre Kompetenz und Effektivität beweisen, z.B. durch kompetentes Gesundheitspersonal sowie ausreichend Mittel, um qualitativ hochwertige Dienstleistungen erbringen zu können. Die WHO berichtet, dass afrikanische Länder mit guter Planung und Logistik große Fortschritte beim Impfen gemacht haben. Ghana hat in den ersten 20 Tagen 90% des gesamten Gesundheitspersonals geimpft. Dank eines erfolgreichen elektronischen Registrierungssystems hat Angola Hochrisikogruppen schnell geimpft.

Der vierte Baustein für Vertrauen ist Verlässlichkeit. Vertrauenswürdige Regierungen müssen Maßnahmen konsequent umsetzen, die Qualität von Programmen kontinuierlich verbessern und Versprechen einhalten. In der Impfkampagne müssen Regierungen genügend Impfdosen zur Verfügung stellen und diese effizient, gleichmäßig und gerecht verteilen, um den Zugang auch in entlegenen Gebieten zu gewährleisten. Länder des globalen Nordens müssen ihr Versprechen einhalten, Impfstoffe für den globalen Süden bereitzustellen. Impfstoffe müssen auch mit ausreichender Haltbarkeit zur Verfügung gestellt werden, sodass diese nicht schon abgelaufen sind, bevor sie verteilt werden können, wie es bei gespendeten Dosen in Nigeria der Fall war.

Impf-Skeptizismus oder -verweigerung ist eine Herausforderung, wenn es darum geht, das Ende der Pandemie zu erreichen. Für eine erfolgreiche globale Impfkampagne müssen Regierungen stetig daran arbeiten, Vertrauen wiederherzustellen. Denn Vertrauen ist ein wesentliches Attribut des sozialen Zusammenhalts. Gesellschaften mit sozialem Zusammenhalt sind in Krisenzeiten widerstandsfähiger und die aktuelle Krise ist sicherlich nicht die letzte, die wir erleben werden.

Pages

THIS IS THE NEW BETA VERSION OF EUROPA VARIETAS NEWS CENTER - under construction
the old site is here

Copy & Drop - Can`t find your favourite site? Send us the RSS or URL to the following address: info(@)europavarietas(dot)org.